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Prostitution in old Oslo

Prostitution was illegal in Norway at the end of the 1800s but allowed in Oslo as long as the women submitted themselves to mandatory medical scrutiny. A new exhibition documents the lives of these women.

Denmark’s past viewed from above

There’s a lot to learn about the past by studying the land from high above. See a series of stunning aerial archaeology photos here.

Drug users in prison want treatment

Drug users are massively overrepresented in Norwegian prisons, but there are few drug treatment programmes.

Why some countries are richer than others

Economists face huge challenges when trying to find the exact reasons for wealth and growth. A new thesis argues that the Roman Catholic order of Cistercians formed the basis for prosperity in the West.

Hospital describes experiences after last year's Oslo terrorist attack

On 22 July 2011, an extreme right-wing domestic terrorist car-bombed key government buildings in Oslo and shot down dozens of youths at a nearby Labour Party camp.

How the tour guide seduces you

Tour guides use a variety of strategies to capture and retain the tourists’ attention.

Brewing Stone Age beer

Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture.

Growing fatter on a GM diet

Rats being fed genetically modified food eat more and grow fatter than those on a non-GM diet.

Believe in yourself and your skin might improve

New research reveals a link between skin health and how strongly we believe in ourselves and our abilities. People with low self-efficacy are more likely to be plagued by itches than people with high self-efficacy.

Open borders, closed Europe

The EU and the member states seem to be heading towards a form of government where punishment and penal policy play a larger role, says Norwegian researcher.

Common parasite linked to suicide

The risk of committing suicide is higher for women who have toxoplasmosis, concludes a study of Danish women.

Not more conflicts where rivers draw the line

Having a river as the border between two countries might seem like a recipe for conflict, with quarrels over water resources and territory. But border rivers are not troubled waters, according to new research.