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Gamers gain points in English

It might seem like a lot of bang-bang nonsense to parents, but Swedish and Norwegian teens drawn to action and role-play computer games have been found to progress in English.

Finding predictability in car brand loyalty

Car brand loyalty involves more than customer satisfaction, it turns out. A new study examines the past purchases of 9000 Norwegian car owners for buying patterns.

Policing weekend drinking binges gets old for officers

Multiple variables play into whether you get arrested or not — among them a police officer’s temperament. Some are more patient than others.

Most food waste from households

Large amounts of food go to waste. Some is disposed of by producers and retailers. But more is tossed out at the consumption stage – by the likes of you and me.

Ambiguous bosses cause recruits to quit

Newly hired employees are often unclear about what is expected of them, according to a new study.

Super villains help prevent evil in the world

Pop culture villains confirm our sense of right and wrong, shows new research.

Lo and Behold! Doctors dig Dylan

Medical researchers seem disposed to borrowing from Bob Dylan’s copious output of lyrics. This has resulted in papers with titles like “Knockin’ on pollen’s door”.

How we recall the details of a good book

We retain the main aspects of the plot in a coherent story. But an erratic tale shifts our attention to the nuances, shows new research.

Two Danish discoveries among 2015's best archaeology

The history of the famous Egtved girl and a DNA study of African slaves are among this year’s greatest discoveries listed in the magazine Archaeology.

Who teaches scholars how to write?

It’s assumed that academic researchers know how to write. The reality is different, but no one wants to talk about it.

Sweden’s promise of a permanent home becomes migrant magnet

Asylum seekers have gone through the trauma of leaving their homes and families. The potential for a new stable life weighs strongly in their choices of where to seek safety.

Facial mites reveal where you come from

Facial mites have always been with us. A new study uses them to find out who we are, and where we come from.