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Sweden’s promise of a permanent home becomes migrant magnet

Asylum seekers have gone through the trauma of leaving their homes and families. The potential for a new stable life weighs strongly in their choices of where to seek safety.

Facial mites reveal where you come from

Facial mites have always been with us. A new study uses them to find out who we are, and where we come from.

Kids who live with both parents in turn fare the best

Children who take turns living with each of their divorced parents generally enjoy better mental health than those living with just one. But this is not necessarily because of their living scheme.

Punctuality more important than grades for apprenticeships

Getting to work on time. An interested and cheerful manner. These matter more to employers than an apprentice’s school grades.

Do stricter border controls increase human trafficking?

Are the EU's strict migration rules increasing the risk of women falling prey to traffickers, as their only way into Europe? New research project aims to find out.

Women choose family-friendly public sector jobs when they have kids

The more children a woman has, the higher the probability is that she will chose a public sector job. But a high percentage of women without children also prefer public sector jobs.

The Scientist’s Guide to Christmas: Part II

How often can we expect a white Christmas in the future? Do women buy better presents than men? ScienceNordic have answers for these and other Christmas-related mysteries.

Turning immigrants into good Scandinavians

Norway, Sweden and Denmark have completely different policies towards refugees and immigrants. These differing approaches raise the question of whether citizenship should be a right or a reward in the Nordic welfare states.

The Scientist’s Guide to Christmas

How do reindeers fly? Why does Santa not burn up when travelling at such high-speeds? ScienceNordic have answers for these and other Christmas-related mysteries.

Life or death for languages

Can languages be resurrected from the (almost) dead? Or is it fine for them to follow in the footsteps of some other languages and die a “natural” death?

Archaeologists develop new technology to read ancient documents

Using X-rays and 3D-modelling, scientists have developed a new method to read ancient texts, which were until now considered unreadable.

Tablets help students write faster – but is that better?

If they need to remember what they write, pencils work better. So what is really best?

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