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Birth weight linked to diabetes and obesity

A large international study has discovered 60 genetic variants that link low birth weight to an increased risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Parenting programmes benefit daddies in prison

Training programmes focusing on fatherhood may make fathers in prison more law-abiding, according to Gunnar Vold Hansen.

Kids are distracted by internet ads

It’s hard for them to avert their eyes from animated advertisements.

Climate change research was born in the Cold War

The basic environmental research that underpins our understanding of the Earth’s climate today has a long history, in part shaped through war and a race to control the North.

Fewer born with genetic predisposition for education

A genetic predisposition towards education seems to also be associated with having fewer children, suggests a new study.

Meet the spin doctors of the fifteenth century

Medieval political spin doctors and lobbyists may have used different methods to their modern day counterparts, but their goals were very much the same.

Danish scientists go back to school

See what ScienceNordic’s partner Videnskab.dk is getting up to as part of the 2017 Danish Science Festival.

Loud music confuses shoppers

Some merchants blast their customers with music in an attempt to increase sales. Swedish research, however, shows that many consumers experience the music as much too intense.

Three tricks to singing better with children

When children sing, they’re learning language. But the right tempo and tone of voice are important factors for them to be able to sing along.

What is basic research?

What is basic research, and is it important? A new theme on ScienceNordic.

Women central to the global fishing industry

Although women play a central role in the fishing industry in many parts of the world, their contribution has not been sufficiently recognised. Now, the gender perspective on fishing is finally asserting itself.

Future features young Muslims and old Buddhists

Buddhists will comprise the religious segment with the largest share of elderly in 2050, predict demographic researchers. Muslims will on average still be the youngest religious population in the world, but the median age of Muslims living in Europe will rise.

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