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Tiny polar creature must deal with competition

Calinoid copepods are tiny creatures of vital importance to the northern polar marine ecosystem. If temperatures in the Arctic Ocean rise, the balance between the species may change.

Personality crucial for endangered species

Endangered animal species need to have their personalities analysed – a prerequisite for scientists to adapt their preservation work to the needs of the individual species.

Letting Latin go at last

Until recently it wasn’t enough just discovering a new species of flora. A scientist would have to know a sufficient amount of Latin to describe the plant. Now the rules have finally been changed.

Lemmings’ loss is bounty for moss

After a prolific lemming year their corpses can be found strewn around the mountains and woods. This is good news for mosses that have specialised in getting nutrients from these dead rodents.

Harmful bacteria invade the groundwater

New research reveals that bacteria in farm slurry seep down to the groundwater before they can be broken down in the subsoil.

Why don’t teeth heal themselves?

Teeth heal themselves to a certain extent. But due to a lack of the right cells they have no chance against visible caries.

Nasty nasal parasite

A parasite found in a reindeer’s nose 25 years ago may not be the most appealing creature to most people, except for scientists.

Research-based cookbook for cavemen and Vikings

The first ever cookbook based on archaeological finds is now out in English. The recipes are based on research from numerous archaeological sites in central and northern Europe.

New tools revolutionise bacteria research

Researchers have generated new standards and tools for research into bacteria. One consequence is greater understanding of how bacteria adapt to humans, so we are better able to develop medicines for combating bacteria that cause diseases.

Sex made birds spread their wings

The discovery of a dinosaur with a glossy metallic plumage suggests it was sex, and not aerodynamics, that drove the evolution of dinosaur feathers and which later enabled birds to fly.

First ever quantum leap in antihydrogen atoms

A research group at CERN has developed a method of mapping the inner structure of an antihydrogen atom. It’s now possible to determine once and for all whether matter and antimatter are exact mirror images of each other.

World’s first animals were preserved in special sea bed

Researchers have discovered how impressions of small molluscs, which could decompose quickly, were preserved for more than 500 million years.

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