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Did a recently found bird spear belong to a kidnapped Greenlander?

A recent archaeological find in Copenhagen – a bird spear from the Thule culture – has put focus on expeditions to rediscover Greenland 400 years ago and the expeditions’ kidnapping of Greenlanders.

How long before a tree rots away?

A fallen pine on the forest floor can take several hundred years longer to decompose than a spruce.

Misleading moths with fake fragrances

The flights of moths and butterflies might appear willy-nilly but the insects are guided by their sense of smell. A pesticide specialist is now developing artificial rowanberry scents to capture moths and protect apple orchards.

Tracking the cuckoo's nest

Squatting in other birds' nests and kicking out legitimate chicks might not give the cuckoo any prize for 'best house guest', but as the only brood parasite in Northern Europe it is a good indicator for the current state of affairs for several bird species.

Remains of gigantic meteorite crater found in Greenland

A Danish geologist has discovered remains of what appears to be the world’s largest and oldest meteor impact crater in Greenland.

Sugar shock for busy bees

When genes that control honey bees’ taste for sweetness are inactivated, the bees nearly end up as diabetics. This can provide hints about the link between our sense of taste and our body's health.

UV light turns mushrooms into vitamin D bombs

Mushrooms produce large amounts of vitamin D when illuminated with ultraviolet light. This discovery could make mushrooms a big hit with vitamin D-starved Scandinavians.

Hybrid fungus threatens agriculture

A new breed of fungus appeared less than 500 years ago, when the genes of two different types were accidentally mixed. Such hybrid fungi may be a threat to agriculture.

Bite me: why mosquitoes love some and leave others

Research reveals why some people are constantly under attack from the bloodsucking insects, while others walk free.

A new formula for avoiding supermarket queues

How do you avoid queues at the supermarket? A researcher shows the way with mathematics.

Unearthing the cause of mass extinction

The cause for mass extinction can be unearthed by looking at big volcano-like offshore structures in Norway and South-Africa.

Mystery: captivity damages flamingo feet

It has long been a mystery why flamingos in captivity suffer foot lesions. A Danish study now claims to have solved a part of this mystery.

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