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Neutrinos’ mass found with help of galaxies

The mass of the neutrino, the lightest particle in the universe, has now been computed more precisely than before.

Carnivorous killer algae found in Danish waters

We know that fish eat plankton and plankton eat algae. Think again, says researcher, who has spotted a form of algae so ferocious that can they overpower animals 10,000 times their own size.

Mapping marine life before oil drilling starts

Foul-smelling bubbles rise from the floor of the Barents Sea. Living organisms in these depths are being studied before the oil and gas industry starts drilling operations.

Wet research two hundred metres below a glacier

A group of scientists is currently working in what is called the world's most claustrophobic laboratory. They are studying glaciers, while blogging for ScienceNordic.

Your guide to sex in the wild

Oysters do it, humans do it and fish do it – even plants do it. We all have sex to ensure the survival of our species. Here's a look at the evolution of this blissful activity.

Tiny polar creature must deal with competition

Calinoid copepods are tiny creatures of vital importance to the northern polar marine ecosystem. If temperatures in the Arctic Ocean rise, the balance between the species may change.

Personality crucial for endangered species

Endangered animal species need to have their personalities analysed – a prerequisite for scientists to adapt their preservation work to the needs of the individual species.

Letting Latin go at last

Until recently it wasn’t enough just discovering a new species of flora. A scientist would have to know a sufficient amount of Latin to describe the plant. Now the rules have finally been changed.

Lemmings’ loss is bounty for moss

After a prolific lemming year their corpses can be found strewn around the mountains and woods. This is good news for mosses that have specialised in getting nutrients from these dead rodents.

Harmful bacteria invade the groundwater

New research reveals that bacteria in farm slurry seep down to the groundwater before they can be broken down in the subsoil.

Why don’t teeth heal themselves?

Teeth heal themselves to a certain extent. But due to a lack of the right cells they have no chance against visible caries.

Nasty nasal parasite

A parasite found in a reindeer’s nose 25 years ago may not be the most appealing creature to most people, except for scientists.