Natural Sciences - latest news

Syndicate content

Why don’t teeth heal themselves?

Teeth heal themselves to a certain extent. But due to a lack of the right cells they have no chance against visible caries.

Nasty nasal parasite

A parasite found in a reindeer’s nose 25 years ago may not be the most appealing creature to most people, except for scientists.

Research-based cookbook for cavemen and Vikings

The first ever cookbook based on archaeological finds is now out in English. The recipes are based on research from numerous archaeological sites in central and northern Europe.

New tools revolutionise bacteria research

Researchers have generated new standards and tools for research into bacteria. One consequence is greater understanding of how bacteria adapt to humans, so we are better able to develop medicines for combating bacteria that cause diseases.

Sex made birds spread their wings

The discovery of a dinosaur with a glossy metallic plumage suggests it was sex, and not aerodynamics, that drove the evolution of dinosaur feathers and which later enabled birds to fly.

First ever quantum leap in antihydrogen atoms

A research group at CERN has developed a method of mapping the inner structure of an antihydrogen atom. It’s now possible to determine once and for all whether matter and antimatter are exact mirror images of each other.

World’s first animals were preserved in special sea bed

Researchers have discovered how impressions of small molluscs, which could decompose quickly, were preserved for more than 500 million years.

Gorilla genome casts new light on human evolution

Scientists have now managed to map the entire gorilla genome. The findings reveal the most accurate picture so far of the evolution of the great ape.

Herbs and berries can preserve meat

Why should the shelf life of meat products be extended by a chemical preservative, nitrite, if nature’s own products, grown ecologically, can be used? Researchers have found eight herbs and berries that can preserve meat – and also offer new flavours.

Barley gene could help feed the world

Researchers from Carlsberg have identified the gene that makes mutant barley bloom faster than regular barley. The discovery could lead to extra food for the world’s poorest nations.

Big algae surprise in mountain lake

A common type of ocean algae has been found in a lake in the mountains of western Norway. Why are they there?

Poor classroom acoustics drive teachers away

Classroom acoustics play an important part in determining a school teacher’s job satisfaction. Poor acoustics can make them consider leaving their job.

Jobs

Follow ScienceNordic on: