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Sea levels could be rising faster than we think

Global warming is preventing the Greenland ice sheet from soaking up as much melt water as it perhaps once did, which could cause sea levels to rise even faster.

Wild horses lost their camouflage because of humans

Scientists find the genetic mechanism that determines the colour patterns of wild horses.

Scientists discover flower seeds from the dinosaur era

The seeds are believed to be those of the very first flowering plants on Earth, making them 110 to 125 million years old.

Greenland has lost 9,000 billion tons of ice in a century

For the first time, scientists have calculated how much ice has disappeared from Greenland in the last 115 years.

When and where did wolves become dogs?

Did dogs become domesticated in Southeast Asia or Europe? New study challenges recent research.

The mysteries of glide avalanches

The glide avalanche is exotic, complex, and not well-understood. Norwegian geologists have gained a better understanding of the mechanics of this special breed of avalanche.

120-year-old astronomical photos discovered in basement

Retired astronomer unearths photo of 1919 solar eclipse that helped prove Einstein's general theory of relativity.

Detecting avalanches with satellite radar

Satellite imagery that can penetrate fog, darkness and storms to detect old and recent avalanche tracks has the potential to help improve avalanche forecasting across Europe.

See what life is like when you study climate change in Greenland

Scientists study uncharted waters and living fossils to document sea ice melt in Northeast Greenland.

Melting Scandinavian glaciers made Europe cool and dry

Scientists have found an explanation for one of the big mysteries in climate science with the help of 12,000-year old Swedish midges.

COP21: What does two degrees Celsius global warming look like?

Two degrees Celsius of global warming is the target for COP21 negotiations in Paris. But even this could lead to sea level rise as high as four metres.

Nature’s engineers keep forests tidy

Trees are tough, even when dead. But a carefully choreographed relationship between specific beetles and fungi is what helps reduce them to sawdust over decades.