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Hummingbirds can fly with almost no oxygen

The hummingbird’s super-fast wing beats are among the most energy-intensive movements in the animal kingdom. Still, the birds can fly 4,000 metres above sea level, where there is very little oxygen. Scientists have now figured out how this is possible.

Secure computation on confidential data

How can data from multi-party computation be used in a calculation if this data must be confidential? Danish computer scientists have come a step closer to an answer.

When insulators become electronics

A new, superconducting oxide system multiplies the electron mobility in electronic oxide transistors. Benefits include superconducting nanotransistors, self-charging electronic devices and a new type of RAM.

Danish students win prestigious Harvard award

A team of Danish undergraduate students has won both the Audience Choice Award and the prize for the best presentation at Harvard University’s international bio-molecular design competition.

Students tote ecosystems in rucksacks

What key discoveries do researchers make about climate change when they use students as sherpas to shuffle ecosystems around on Norway’s west coast fjord landscapes?

Wolves became domesticated dogs much earlier than thought

Finnish researchers have discovered that wolves were domesticated by European hunter-gatherers between 19,000 and 32,000 years ago. The analysis cannot, however, be used to determine the origin of the dog, argues Danish DNA scientist.

Effective method in quest for new physics

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator smashes protons together with such great force that it can give birth to hitherto unknown particles. A new method makes it easier to recognise the new particles.

Wolves help support forest scavengers

Scavengers such as foxes, ravens and golden eagles get more year-round access to food supplies in wolf territories than in forests devoid of wolves.

New record: World’s oldest animal is 507 years old

It’s time to rewrite the record books. New accurate dating shows that the world’s oldest animal was 507 years old when it died in 2006. That’s more than 100 years older than previously thought.

Heat waves take a toll in Stockholm

High temperatures linked to climate change are already causing premature deaths in Stockholm. The elderly are most vulnerable.

Spiders exchange gifts for sex

Female spiders like being courted with gifts from their male counterparts. New research shows that the females store more sperm from males if they bring a gift prior to mating.

New micro pills make swallowing easy

New research project aims to make pills easier to swallow by encapsulating medicine in micro-containers. The containers can be used for all types of medicine – including those currently taken by injection.

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