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Meet the copepod: the oceans’ little carbon sponge

Marine scientists race to improve their estimates of just how much carbon is stored in the deep ocean.

Cosmic neutrinos reveal the universe’s violent history

Astrophysicists can start using the ghostly elementary particles called neutrinos to learn about some of the most violent events in the universe.

The riddle of rodents

Last year so many rodents roamed Norwegian forests that residences were overrun, from mountain cabin attics to house basements. This summer in southern Norway, rodent numbers have plummeted to roughly one-hundredth of what they were just a year ago.

Genetics confirm: Migrants brought farming to the Mediterranean

Scientists have sequenced the genomes of early farmers from Spain, confirming that they descended from the same group of migrants who brought farming to Northern Europe.

What 142 million year old footprints reveal about dinosaur behaviour

Two sets of fossilized dinosaur footprints on a beach in Germany provide insights into the ancient giants' behaviour.

Rodent population swings remain a mystery

They’re small and almost unnoticeable, until their population explodes. Now recent swings in Norway’s small rodent populations have underscored the importance of these creatures for the health of the entire natural community.

There are now 3.04 trillion trees on earth

Scientists have calculated the total number of trees of earth: 422 for each person. And we have lost almost the same number since the dawn of human civilisation.

Suggesting answers to one of Darwin’s mysteries

Why do we see so little evolution in some fossils?

Scientists create first cybertype of Avatar millipede species

New method allows for cataloguing and detailed study of virtual specimens.

Scientists clash: Is there an exercise hormone?

Norwegian researchers claimed that the so-called exercise hormone irisin is merely a myth. Now the discoverers of irisin are fighting back, writing that they have irrefutable evidence that the hormone works in humans.

Modern industrialisation killed ocean cooling

Ocean temperatures were cooling for almost two millennia but then human industrialisation came along.

Nerd camp with hands-on science

Some Norwegian pre-teen children spend a week of their summer holiday to learn more about maths and science. Their instructors hope what they mostly learn is that science is fun.

Today's selected stories