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Europe hit by devastating tsunamis 8,200 years ago

New research shows how tsunamis hit Northwest Europe 8200 years ago, ravaging Stone Age coastal communities as far south as Denmark.

Loss of large animals has reduced global circulation of vital nutrients

Decline of large animals such as whales, sea birds, and salmon has led to a loss of 94 per cent of the transportation of nutrients on the planet.

Scientists rewrite the history of an ancient region

Origins of ancient Chinese landscape revealed by new study. Could hold important information on climate change.

This is what a 50-million-year-old bat looked like

Scientists have for the first time determined the colour of an extinct mammal: a bat that lived 50 million years ago.

Archaeologists unearth 2000-year-old Iron Age sacrifices

ScienceNordic was on the scene when archaeologists excavated a sacred bog from the Iron Age.

Swedish lizards are thriving under rising temperatures

A northern species of lizards are bucking global trends when it comes to climate change. New research shows that they can adapt quickly by laying their eggs earlier.

Bacteria in the atmosphere cause rain

Scientists think that bacteria in the atmosphere are playing an important role in making it rain.

Light from distant galaxies can reveal extra-terrestrial life

Physicists can now trace light emitted by plants and microorganisms on planets far away.

The enamel on your teeth came from prehistoric fish

A new study combining genes and 420 million year old fossils reveals that our tooth enamel developed from fish scales.

Time to rethink how fungi and bacteria impact the climate

A Swedish and US researcher think climate models have to be revised. A Norwegian expert has doubts about that.

Scientists confirm the world’s only twin asteroid strike in Sweden

460 million years ago, two asteroids struck Earth in what is now Sweden. It is the only proven example of such a double strike.

Scientists discover mountains that haven’t changed in a million years.

Special ice layer protected Svalbard’s mountain ranges for at least one million years.

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