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Hummingbirds are ecological super-specialists

...and thus vulnerable to climate change and habitat destruction.

How Nordic marine forests can help fight climate change

Despite the wealth of marine forests throughout the Nordics, we are yet to exploit their potential role in combating climate change. Here’s what we need to do.

Marine forests - Nature's own carbon capture and storage

Kelp forests and seagrass meadows soak up carbon dioxide and help protect our coasts against rising seas. Just two reasons why we should learn to love our marine forests.

Thousands of objects discovered in Scandinavia’s first Viking city

Danish archaeologists have excavated the streets beneath Ribe to discover how the first city of the Viking age was established.

Could rising land slow down Antarctic ice melt?

The West Antarctic ice sheet is sitting under water. This is key to understanding the evolution of the ice sheet and how the rising sea floor might even help to slow down ice melt in this part of Antarctica.

How fast can Antarctica rise when the ice melts?

New study shows that the land underneath a part of West Antarctica is rising five times faster than expected as the ice melts, revealing a surprisingly soft Earth structure beneath the ice sheet.

Boreal lakes are becoming browner, but the fish don’t mind

Boreal lakes can become darker over time by a process known as “browning.” But these darker waters do not seem to affect fish as much as researchers once thought.

House sparrows and humans are old buddies

These little beggars have hung around humans for more than 11,000 years, new Norwegian research suggests.

How the last ice age changed Norway

Researchers are learning more about what happened when several thousand metres of ice covered Norway roughly 10 000 years ago.

Male cockroaches that have frequent sex eat more protein

This is most likely because they need protein to produce new sperm and a nuptial gift packed with nutrients that the female can pass on to her unborn young.

Mass extinction 66 million years ago paved the way for modern shark communities

The famous mass extinction of dinosaurs also impacted oceanic animals and in particular, sharks. A new study reveals how the balance of modern shark biodiversity can be traced back to this very event.

The truth is in the sediments

OPINION: The seafloor has different patterns on top than underneath the surface. Researchers at Nord University suggest that new seafloor research in the Lofoten-Vesterålen region contributes to future marine management.