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Gravitational wave discovery was most likely a measurement error

New analysis from the European Planck satellite suggests the physicists underestimated influence of cosmic dust.

Quicker lymphoma test for dogs

A blood sample is all that is needed in a faster and easier test to see whether dogs have lymph cancer.

Scientists create crystals that absorb and store oxygen

New substance binds extremely concentrated quantities of oxygen, could have many uses as the oxygen can be released again when needed.

New method to detect toxin can replace animal testing

A chemical analysis can effectively detect botulism types, thus avoiding the need to sacrifice mice as part of the diagnostic process.

Danish physicist stores light, moves it around, and makes it reappear

Renowned physicist Lene Hau does not only know how to stop light, but also manipulate it and save it’s imprints for later use.

OPINION: Re-thinking the Nobel Science Prizes

Yes, Norway needs to focus more on top-quality research. But the growing fixation on prizes prompts the need for a gentle reminder about the meaning of the Nobel Prize. Just what do we actually know about these prizes?

Zebras attracted to lethal anthrax grass

Grazing zebras in Namibia fall for a deadly temptation. Grass and vegetation grows better at spots where anthrax infections have caused animals to fall down, die and decompose.

Surprisingly high levels of radioactivity in Norwegian reindeer and sheep

It has been almost 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear disaster sprayed radioactive fallout across parts of Europe. Nevertheless, Norwegian officials have measured much higher levels of radioactive contamination than usual in grazing animals this autumn.

Norwegians share in Nobel Prize for discovering brain’s GPS

The Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology has been awarded with one half to John O’Keefe of University College London and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser, a husband-and-wife team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Opinion: Is chemistry going backward in Norway?

Governments come and go and, with each government, comes a new science policy in Norway, and a new buzzword. Yet, as I look at my own field – chemistry, a major area of science – there seems to have been scant progress over the last two decades.

Math teachers need to understand how pupils think

In order to improve the teaching of mathematics, it is essential that teachers understand how the pupils think when they solve a problem. Insights from research can help.

Scientists shock cod to gauge pain

Tests on Atlantic cod could lead to a discovery of whether fish simply react to harmful stimuli or actually feel pain much as we do.

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