Natural Sciences - latest news

Syndicate content

Greenland Ice Sheet has already caused nearly five metres sea-level rise

New calculations show the true extent of ice melt from the Greenland ice sheet over the past 23,000 years.

Horses can communicate through symbols

Horses can learn to use symbols to tell their owner if they are cold, shows new research.

Earth set for large-scale wildlife reshuffle

Totally new climate regimes have already emerged this century and further changes are likely to cause new species assemblages to appear throughout the world, shows new study.

New theory explains how metals melt and freeze

Physicists have discovered how the melting process works at extreme pressures such as those found inside the Earth’s core.

Is Iceland's Katla volcano crying wolf?

OPINION: The Icelandic volcano's rumblings do not necessarily mean that airspace chaos is imminent

Seaweed plays a surprisingly large role in global climate

Scientists urge for greater protection of kelp forests as a new study shows that they remove more carbon from the atmosphere than previously thought.

World’s oldest vertebrate discovered in Greenland

GREENLAND: The discovery of a 512-year-old Greenland Shark shows how little we still know about the ocean, say scientists.

Forget thawing food in your fridge, use water instead

A tenacious myth would have you believe the best way to thaw frozen food is slowly, in the refrigerator. But food science researchers say it’s just not so.

Elephant seals help scientists study climate change

Data collected by elephant seals reveal key chemical changes in the sea around Antarctica that drive ocean circulation and climate.

New maths to predict dangerous hospital epidemics

Mathematicians are now developing completely new statistical calculations on the world’s fastest computers in order to be able to predict how epidemics of dangerous hospital bacteria spread.

World’s oldest fossils discovered in Greenland

GREENLAND: Scientists have discovered bacterial structures in 3.7 billion year-old rocks in Greenland, indicating that life began earlier than previously thought.

Human-induced global warming began 180 years ago

An international team of scientists have detected a warming signal in some parts of the globe from as early as the 1830s.

Jobs

Follow ScienceNordic on: