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Scientists shock cod to gauge pain

Tests on Atlantic cod could lead to a discovery of whether fish simply react to harmful stimuli or actually feel pain much as we do.

How the wild rabbit was domesticated

Wild rabbits and domestic rabbits have more or less the same genes. According to a new study, when tame rabbits escape, natural selection ensures their survival in the wild.

Scientists discover origins of cosmic dust

Danish scientists have solved the mystery of how cosmic dust is formed. The new knowledge could help the study of distant galaxies.

Mice population explodes

The mouse population has spiked in southern Norway this year. Scientists have rarely seen such increases.

Honeybees appear to be Asian

The first global genetic analysis of honeybees reveals new insights into their history.

The lichen that only likes Galdhøpiggen

The lichen species Altissima has never been found anywhere else than the summit of Norway’s highest mountain – Galdhøpiggen.

Fish in drug-tainted water see some benefits

Swedish freshwater perch have been seen to thrive in water contaminated by anti-anxiety medications. Researchers think most studies, which look solely at the negative aspects of pharmaceutical pollution, could be missing some perks for perch.

Nobel prize winner: Let’s find dark matter and dark energy

Dark matter and dark energy continue to be cosmological conundra for physicists worldwide. Nobel prize winner Brian Schmidt offers his perspective in an interview.

How spiders make their silk

Spider silk is one of the strongest materials known, and the arachnids make it faster than greased lightning.

How ancient squids survived extreme climate change

Scientists have uncovered how ancient squid-like animals survived dramatic climate changes not unlike those we see today.

Exhibition fuses fossils with rock music

The term oldies in rock takes on a different meaning as heavy-rock polychaete annelid worm and Mark Knopfler’s dinosaur arrive at Oslo’s Natural History Museum.

Ultra-precise atomic clock will reveal if physical constants really are constant

New network of quantum entangled clocks will be so precise that it can measure if physical constants change on a daily basis.