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Hormone-impairing substances make daughters fat

Pregnant women with high levels of hormone-impairing substances in their blood have a three times higher risk than other women of giving birth to daughters who will be overweight at the age of 20.

Allergy is a serious public health issue

Food allergies are seen as a serious public health issue in many countries, and a recent report on severe allergic reactions in Norway shows that there are gender differences, age-related risk groups and nuts to watch out for.

Defects found in infertile women’s eggs

For the first time ever researchers have developed a method for studying women’s immature eggs. The new findings could pave the way for customised fertility treatment.

Men say women weigh too much

Men are fatter than they think, and they perceive women as being fatter than they really are. These distorted body images can also apply to how we view our children and could cause serious problems for both sexes.

Calming the fears of expectant mothers

A pregnant woman’s psychological problems do not pass on pre-natally to their offspring as behavioural problems. A mum’s mental health issues that last for years, however, do have an impact on their children’s behaviour.

Why do men grow bald?

Why do men - and not women - lose their hair?. Scientists have the answers and some advice too.

Teens are major yellow staph carriers

Seven out of ten 15- and 16-year-olds in two municipalities in Northern Norway are long-term carriers of yellow staphylococci in their throats and about half carry the bacteria in their nasal passages.

Fish oil helps pigs through operations

Tests with pigs show that a diet rich in fish oil improves recovery after operations. The same positive effects could apply to humans too.

Geriatric gaming

Old people are saying “Yes Wii can” and have fun staying in shape with video games. Scientists now want to give them an array of suitable games.

A single protein controls our metabolism

A certain type of cell in our body controls our metabolism and helps decide whether we are hungry or not. This could lead to a drug for controlling obesity.

Tapeworm parasites in the brain give epilepsy

Traces of pork tapeworm that end up in the human brain can cause epilepsy, but both the parasite and its complications in the form of disease can be fought.

Chronicles for the comatose

Norwegian nurses keep diaries for their patients who are in comas. When patients wake up these special journals can help them cope with traumas.

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