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The epidemic that was wiped out

Smallpox is one of the most devastating diseases known to humanity, but also a great success story of modern medicine.

The horrific disease that won’t die

The agonising history of leprosy in Norway has been relocated to a museum in Bergen. The misery was so overwhelming that it inspired pioneering initiatives. It resulted in the world’s first patient registry and the discovery of leprosy bacilli.

Exercise better for health than dietary changes

Men should exercise every day and get their heart rate up a few times a week. This makes them healthier than if they change their diet to lose weight.

You're probably not what you eat

New study shows that we can never be sure how our bodies react when we for instance eat less meat and more vegetables. It’s probably our genes teasing the nutrition experts.

Air pollution hospitalises small children

Rising numbers of small children are hospitalised with asthma when air pollution increases, new study shows. One surprising finding is that ultra-fine particles from road traffic play only a little role.

Backs get strained by overweight

Overweight women have a 60 per cent higher risk of chronic lower back pain. If the general population gets heavier, this will cause an increase in disabilities.

Voluntary sex causes as many vaginal injuries as rape

New research surprises by showing that vaginal injuries are just as common after regular intercourse as after a rape. The findings could have great implications for forensic investigations into rape cases.

Toys contaminated with harmful bacteria

Harmful bacteria contaminate toys, cushions, sofas, tables and chairs in day-care institutions for children, making them ill. Maybe nanotechnology can help solve the problem.

New vaccine could eradicate tuberculosis

Tuberculosis has hit one in three persons in the world. Researchers have now created an effective vaccine against this deadly and highly infectious disease.

Serious ruptures during deliveries are on the decline in Norway

For forty years the number of serious tears of tissue among women giving birth was on the rise in Norway. Now the occurrence of these injuries is declining due to preventive measures.

The chemistry of cake baking

Most cakes contain eggs, milk, flour and sugar. Now there’s a way to make them without one or more of these ingredients.

Confirmed: vitamin pills can cause death

Dietary supplements containing vitamin A, E and beta-carotene increase mortality significantly, new research shows. A medical consultant says healthy people shouldn’t take them.