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Working night shifts is unlikely to increase risk of breast cancer

New study shows that working night shifts for a short period does not increase the risk of developing breast cancer.

One step, or two steps at a time?

The job is the same, but what gives the best exercise?

New technique cures deadly bladder cancer in mice

Scientists have developed an artificial malaria protein that can halt the growth of bladder cancer in mice. They will now test it on other forms of cancer before starting human trials.

Self-harm links to violence against others

Researchers behind a Swedish study do not think that self-harm leads to violent crimes. But there is an underlying association between deliberate self-harm and violent criminality.

Can microRNA in food harm us? No, say scientists

Scientists express doubt over previous study that reported how genetic material from food can enter the blood stream and affect our health.

Do antidepressants do more harm than good?

SSRI medication for depression does more harm than good, according to Danish researchers. A leading Norwegian psychiatrist questions their research methods.

People with children vaccinate themselves to protect their loved ones

Childless, single persons may take vaccines because they deem it important to protect vulnerable segments of society. Parents seem to be more concerned about protecting their own family.

Surgery in Norway just a bit riskier than in Sweden

A new study shows that there were more surgical errors in Norwegian hospitals than in Swedish ones in 2013. Ninety of the Swedish and Norwegian patients whose journals were used in the study died from what are categorised as “adverse events”.

Mothers to all boys have shorter life expectancy and more illness

Women who only give birth to boys have a shorter life expectancy and run a higher risk of becoming ill compared with mothers of daughters, or both sons and daughters, shows a new Ph.D. thesis.

Mammography screening does not stop advanced breast cancer

Many healthy women are diagnosed with cancer even though the cancer would never have made them ill, shows new research.

Promising treatment for deadly brain cancer

A brain cancer that mainly affects children may be slowed by a treatment that is already being tested for a different type of cancer.

Men tend to get more severe psoriasis

A Swedish study shows that more men than women suffer severe psoriasis.

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