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Stopping treatment with blood-thinning drug can be fatal

Patients being treated with the blood-thinning medicine warfarin should be wary of breaking off their treatment as they then run a considerable risk of developing blood clots in the brain.

Where does all the snot come from?

How can humans produce so much phlegm or mucous?

A big butt can be a great asset

Fat on the hips and thighs is not unhealthy – it helps you live longer. It’s the belly fat you should worry about, say scientists.

Why do you get the stomach flu?

Why is it so hard to avoid a virus that forces us into the bathroom and makes us stick our heads in the toilet bowl?

Weight loss without exercise – really?

A newly discovered hormone could lead to a drug that can raise the body's energy conversion and minimise the risk of type 2 diabetes – without exercise.

Diet outweighs exercise in fighting child obesity

A lower intake of calories is more important than physical exercise when heavy children try to lose weight. Parents also have to be strongly involved.

Poor sleep linked to premature death

People with sleeping problems have poorer health and a shorter life expectancy. Research indicates that poor sleep is a problem to be taken seriously.

Use your bedroom for sleep and sex only

We have grown more prone to going to bed with technological sleep thieves. But use of mobile phones and PCs at bedtime links to poor sleeping habits.

Stress and exercise repair the brain after a stroke

New research reveals that a combination of stress and exercise can shorten the rehabilitation period after a stroke.

Parkinson’s treatment minus side effects

A new drug combination may be able to eliminate the negative side effects of medicine used for treating Parkinson’s disease.

The chocolate that won’t make you fat

By adding linseed and chilli to dark chocolate, researchers can raise your metabolism so you can eat chocolate without putting on weight.

How acidosis develops during exercise

Vigorous exercise causes lactic acid to accumulate in our muscles, making them acidotic. New research shows that several key organs play a surprising role in this process – even during moderate exercise.