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Tapeworm parasites in the brain give epilepsy

Traces of pork tapeworm that end up in the human brain can cause epilepsy, but both the parasite and its complications in the form of disease can be fought.

Chronicles for the comatose

Norwegian nurses keep diaries for their patients who are in comas. When patients wake up these special journals can help them cope with traumas.

Self-harm is not only for troubled teens

Self-inflicted cuts and burns have become such a widespread phenomenon that ordinary, otherwise well-balanced young people have started doing it. The problem is seen in both sexes to an equal degree.

Baby cries shorten our reaction time

The sound of a baby crying motivates our brain’s alertness and sharpens our ability to react with highly accurate movements. The sound of a woman crying does not have the same effect.

Nuts good for fighting obesity and diabetes

Special amino acids in nuts reduce obesity and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, shows new research which can lead to dietary pills.

How stress can cause depression

Studies with rats and humans reveal how chronic stress can result in a depression.

Fast or slow prostate cancer?

Some types of prostate cancer progress so slowly that the patient never requires treatment. The challenge now is to find out which patients need treatment and which don't.

Understand the uterus and get fewer premature babies

A better understanding of in the way the uterus works could significantly reduce the number of preterm births. Icelandic researchers are looking into new methods of solving the problem.

We buy healthier food than in previous generations

Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions. But although we are getting larger and heavier, our diet has become healthier over the last 100 years.

Can water spoil?

A half-full bottle of water has been left in the fridge for months. Can we drink it?

Oslo terrorism response: fine medical effort despite flaws

Emergency medical teams made significant efforts when they treated the victims of last year's terrorist attacks in Oslo. But there were flaws.

Everyday chemicals impair effects of vaccines

High concentrations of so-called PFCs in children’s blood reduce the effect of vaccines, a new Faroese/Danish study shows.