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Bacteria can wake up in your kitchen after a thousand years of sleep

Do you ever cook too much rice or pasta and save the remains for another day? Then you should watch out for this little critter. The bacteria can have been dormant for over a millennium – only to be energised back to life when you prepare your dinner.

Scientists reprogram fat cells to increase fat burning

Scientists discover how fat cells can be reprogrammed to burn fat instead of storing it.

One in five surgeons forgets to wash hands after going to the toilet

A group of researchers examined the hand hygiene among surgeons attending an American conference and the results were not impressive.

Scientists discover which genes determine your height

Your height is the result of an incredible number of small variations in your genetic material. Scientists have now identified these variations by analysing data from more than 250,000 people.

Safe in traffic despite impaired hearing

People with reduced hearing are not any worse at driving cars than others.

Intense intervals every fortnight are all that’s needed

A gruelling set of high-intensity interval training once every two weeks can suffice to keep footballers who are below the elite level in good shape during the winter lull.

Scientists uncover how our body fights off blood clots

Our body has its own system to combat blood clots and a team of Danish scientists have found out how it works.

How hoteliers handle emotions and stress

Experienced hotel managers maintain a positive attitude while switching among various ways of controlling their emotions, tackling stress and covering their employees’ needs.

Danish doctors: saving Ebola patients could be this simple

Thousands of Ebola patients could be saved if they were offered simple treatment consisting of salts and fluids, say Danish doctors.

Giant study links C-sections with chronic disorders

People born by C-section, more often suffer from chronic disorders such as asthma, rheumatism, allergies, bowel disorders, and leukaemia than people born naturally.

Night shifts raise the risk of breast cancer

Women whose shifts include the four hours from midnight to four in the morning for much of their working life have an elevated risk of breast cancer.

Smoking causes damage to the Y chromosome

New research may explain why smoking causes several types of cancer in men.

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