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Deciphering the confusing language of food expiry dates

The world wastes a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes of edible food annually, some of which is due to confusion over expiry dates. ScienceNordic helps you figure out what to eat and what to toss.

Obese people more susceptible to infection

Obese people are more likely to suffer from throat or lung infections, shows new research.

Why Norwegians look forward to long winter nights

Norwegians have found a way to celebrate the beauty of dark polar nights instead of dread them. One psychology student thinks the rest of the world can learn something from this mindset.

New method helps schizophrenics become self-aware

New treatment helps schizophrenia patients deal with their everyday experiences, and might result in long-term behavioural change.

Painkillers lower fertility in mice

Female mice lost half of their eggs when their mother was exposed to painkillers during pregnancy.

Genetic tests uncover lethal legacy — at a price

It’s become ever easier to test for mutations that increase a woman’s risk of breast and ovarian cancer. But what kind of psychological burden does the test impose on women who take it?

Vegans gain some and lose some

Vegans consume fewer trans fats, sugars and salt than the rest of do but a new study indicates they get insufficient quantities of vitamins and minerals. One challenge is that their bodies are naturally incapable of metabolising all the nutrients they eat.

Driving home from night shifts is risky

Graveyard shift workers are not only subjected to higher risks of health problems – they can pose an immediate threat to themselves and others when heading home for bed.

Breast milk sends genetic messages to the child

Genetic material in breast milk may have a stronger effect on child health and development than scientists previously thought, according to new research.

Antibiotics are effective at treating asthma

Antibiotics reduced the number of sick days caused by asthma attacks in young children by more than 50 per cent, shows new study.

Pacemakers make heart patients anxious and depressed

Pacemakers save lives, but they also increase fear of heart disease, which can destroy patients’ quality of life and lead to a premature death.

Exercise improves patient health

Proper physical training helps patients recover from a variety of diseases including diabetes, lung disease, and cancer, shows new study.

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