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Another good reason to eat chocolate

New study finds that chocolate is good for our health and may help protect against cardiac fibrillation.

Mums with low iodine intake risk kids with behavioural problems

However, researchers are uncertain whether an iodine deficiency leads to a delay in brain development.

How do you talk to people about your HIV diagnosis?

People with HIV often wonder when and how they should talk about their diagnosis, Swedish research shows. They fear that people will pull away if they are open about their disease.

Preventing dangerous hypotension during C-sections

Eight out of ten women who elect caesarean delivery with spinal anaesthesia experience such a drop in blood pressure that it can endanger both mother and child. A recent study shows how to best prevent this.

Losing a sibling leads to higher risk of early death

Losing a sibling in childhood increases the risk of an early death by 71 per cent, shows new research. “It’s alarming,” say scientists.

More calories burned with one large meal instead of several small ones

Weight watchers might be keen to hear that calorie intake is not a simple factor of metabolism. What you eat and how you eat it can have an effect on how much energy a body burns and how full a person feels.

Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life

OPINION: Doctors can identify men who are at risk of serious diseases after they become fathers with simple and cheap tests. It is no longer enough to just evaluate the number of sperm.

More ADHD among December’s kids

Children born at the end of the year are statistically more likely to end up with an ADHD diagnosis than those born early in the year. Medical scientists are uncertain why.

Gastric bypass surgery halved the risk of heart failure

A new study shows that obesity links to a higher risk of heart failure.

Hazardous substances are still distributed long after being banned

It can take decades for the EU to ban a substance that contains endocrine disrupting chemicals and even then sales of products containing these chemicals can continue for years.

One in four has gone to work with a hangover

In the past year, a quarter of Norwegians say that they have gone to work with a hangover or have been ineffective due to alcohol intake the night before, and five percent have taken a sick day for a hangover.

EU authorities too slow: People exposed to endocrine disrupters for decades

It takes decades to ban substances suspected of containing endocrine disrupters. The process is far too slow and could have consequences for our health.

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