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Is it dangerous to eat food grown right by the road?

A reader wonders how pollution affects the food crops that grow along Norwegian roads.

Do you have a sweet tooth? Blame it on your liver

New research shows that a certain hormone produced in the liver could explain your sweet tooth and help produce new treatments to reduce people’s cravings for sugar.

Norwegian vaccine against prostate cancer shows promising results

A vaccine developed in Norway stimulates the immune system to curb prostate cancer and has given results among nearly 90 percent of the participants.

The twins from Tynset and the mystery disease

Everything seemed fine with the twins from Tynset — until they gradually lost their vision and the ability to walk. After 50 years, doctors and scientists have finally solved their medical mystery.

Fishing for blood clots will help more stroke victims

A new procedure to remove blood clots from stroke victims’ brains will now be available to more patients. The method is more efficient and can save more lives than other types of medication. But the decision has been “scandalously slow” in coming, says senior physician and professor.

Just one in ten children “with food allergies” actually had them

Parents had steered their offspring away from a variety of foods they thought their kids were allergic to. When researchers examined the children they found that just one in ten really had a food allergy.

Cod may be healthier than salmon for overweight men

When researchers looked at the diets of northern Norwegian men over a 13-year period, they found that lean fish was good for both cholesterol and blood pressure levels. But not everyone is sure this is true.

Marriage reduces testosterone in men

A new study shows that marriage can explain a drop in men’s testosterone level. The biological reasons are unknown but scientists speculate that the answer lies in our evolutionary history.

Possible link between hormone treatment and sexuality: study

In a study of 34 people, some adults were more likely to identify as homosexual or bisexual if their mother took progesterone while pregnant. But is just one of the many factors that might influence our sexuality, say scientists.

Epilepsy diagnoses in Norwegian children were wrong one-third of the time

The misdiagnoses mean some children were given medications they didn’t need.

Working night shifts is unlikely to increase risk of breast cancer

New study shows that working night shifts for a short period does not increase the risk of developing breast cancer.

One step, or two steps at a time?

The job is the same, but what gives the best exercise?

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