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Losing a sibling leads to higher risk of early death

Losing a sibling in childhood increases the risk of an early death by 71 per cent, shows new research. “It’s alarming,” say scientists.

More calories burned with one large meal instead of several small ones

Weight watchers might be keen to hear that calorie intake is not a simple factor of metabolism. What you eat and how you eat it can have an effect on how much energy a body burns and how full a person feels.

Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life

OPINION: Doctors can identify men who are at risk of serious diseases after they become fathers with simple and cheap tests. It is no longer enough to just evaluate the number of sperm.

More ADHD among December’s kids

Children born at the end of the year are statistically more likely to end up with an ADHD diagnosis than those born early in the year. Medical scientists are uncertain why.

Gastric bypass surgery halved the risk of heart failure

A new study shows that obesity links to a higher risk of heart failure.

Hazardous substances are still distributed long after being banned

It can take decades for the EU to ban a substance that contains endocrine disrupting chemicals and even then sales of products containing these chemicals can continue for years.

One in four has gone to work with a hangover

In the past year, a quarter of Norwegians say that they have gone to work with a hangover or have been ineffective due to alcohol intake the night before, and five percent have taken a sick day for a hangover.

EU authorities too slow: People exposed to endocrine disrupters for decades

It takes decades to ban substances suspected of containing endocrine disrupters. The process is far too slow and could have consequences for our health.

Found sedatives and illegal drugs in one out of 20 health care and transport workers

Researchers found traces of sleeping pills, Valium, morphine, cannabis and amphetamines in spit samples of over three percent of employees on the job. The highest percentages of these were workers in the restaurant trade, in the transport sector and the health services.

Bad chemistry: Chemical companies fail to comply with EU regulations

Chemical companies are required to document that their chemicals are safe but the majority withhold or submit incomplete information to the European authorities, allowing dangerous substances to stay on the market.

What drugs are safe for pregnant women?

A recent study reveals that one in four pregnant Norwegian women takes medications that are considered risky. Some of the drugs help with pain or nausea, but can have negative side effects on the mother or child.

Fewer women tore when giving birth at home

Fewer women suffer perineal trauma – a tearing or needing to be snipped, when deliveries are at home instead of hospitals or clinics.

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