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Personalised prescriptions according to your genetics

New genetic risk factor identified for a rare but severe reaction to a poplar type of blood pressure medication.

Treating irritable bowel syndrome with transplanted faeces

Faecal transplantation may work well for some individuals with IBS, a new Norwegian study shows.

How our gut influences our health

Why gut bacteria are essential for a healthy immune system.

Men live longer with ALS than women

Stephen Hawking lived for more than 50 years with ALS. In Norway, more men than women use medicine to combat the disease and they live longer with the diagnosis, a Norwegian study shows.

New method identifies type 2 diabetics at risk of early death

Urine analysis can indicate patients at risk of early cardiovascular death.

Body-image pressure, school and worries make more girls mentally ill

More and more young girls seek help for mental problems. “Generally, girls take things more seriously than boys. This applies to school, friends and family,” says researcher Anders Bakken.

No new drugs for Alzheimer's disease in 15 years

But hope is on the horizon that new drugs will emerge soon. Here is what the ongoing clinical trials have in store.

More than just hot flashes — menopause has its positive side

Only one in three women has problems during menopause, when women’s oestrogen levels plummet and menstruation stops. One Danish physician says many women experience this as a positive time in their lives.

Women have healthier lifestyles, but are sicker

Norwegian women live healthier lives than their male counterparts. Nevertheless, they have more health problems. Why is that?

Cars are no protection from polluted air

Winter cold raises questions about what the combination of cold air and traffic means for air quality. Norwegian traffic researchers respond.

Traditional Norwegian foods could be good choice for pregnant women with bowel diseases

Women with bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are more likely to have small or premature babies.

Greenlandic gene could be key to beating obesity

The Inuit people carry a genetic variant, which increases their risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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