Health - latest news

Syndicate content

More than just hot flashes — menopause has its positive side

Only one in three women has problems during menopause, when women’s oestrogen levels plummet and menstruation stops. One Danish physician says many women experience this as a positive time in their lives.

Women have healthier lifestyles, but are sicker

Norwegian women live healthier lives than their male counterparts. Nevertheless, they have more health problems. Why is that?

Cars are no protection from polluted air

Winter cold raises questions about what the combination of cold air and traffic means for air quality. Norwegian traffic researchers respond.

Traditional Norwegian foods could be good choice for pregnant women with bowel diseases

Women with bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are more likely to have small or premature babies.

Greenlandic gene could be key to beating obesity

The Inuit people carry a genetic variant, which increases their risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes.

School programme tackling child obesity had no effect

A big experimental programme tested out activities that would encourage students to eat healthier and be more active. It had no effect.

Test yourself: Are you addicted to exercise?

Danish researchers have developed a world first. It is a new method to spot exercise addiction among children and young adults.

Why you should read and train to boost your brain

Exercise and reading create visible changes in the brain, according to research on nuns and rats in luxury cages. The brain can generate new brain cells and neural pathways, offering hope for stroke victims.

Are mercury dental fillings really that dangerous?

If mercury is unhealthy for us to eat in fish, why is it okay for it to be in dental amalgam in our mouths?

Genetic predisposition for obesity increases risk of asthma

Some cases of asthma might be avoided by maintaining a healthy weight.

Genetic test identifies “high risk” lymphatic cancer patients

Patients with mantle cell lymphoma are more likely to relapse if they carry mutations in the cancer gene, TP53. The results could help provide more targeted treatments for this “high risk” group.

More breast cancer among women with benign findings

Women who are called in for more testing after mammography and whose results are then OK are more likely than others to develop breast cancer in the subsequent two years. But the absolute risk remains low.

Jobs

Follow ScienceNordic on: