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HIV type 2 is more serious than previously believed

HIV-2 was considered to be a milder variant of HIV, but a new Swedish study shows that it can still develop to AIDS if left untreated.

Elite female athletes at greater risk of eating disorders

Especially in disciplines like running and gymnastics, where body weight is especially associated with aesthetics and fast running times.

Strength training helps the over 70s bulk up

A Swedish study suggests it’s probably never too late to increase muscle mass.

How sleep washes away our worries

New Book: Why you often feel better after a good night's sleep.

Women excel at hiding autism

But this can cause health problems in the long run.

Lifestyle affects cancer risk, but the biggest risk is getting old

Old age is not for the weak of heart: Nine out of ten cases of cancer occur after we reach the age of 50, new numbers from the Norwegian Cancer Registry show.

Baby's gut bacteria might predict obesity

A study of Norwegian children suggests that intestinal bacteria composition at age two correlates closely with weight gain later in childhood.

More people suffer from heart attacks in bad weather: study

But scientists do not know if bad weather on its own is the culprit. We might simply engage in activities that result in more heart attacks, such as shovelling snow.

Acne bacteria survive by feasting on their hosts

Acne causing bacteria feed on a type of carbohydrate in the body, called N-glycans. It could help explain why acne can be so resistant to treatment.

Scientists identify genes associated with Tourette syndrome

Heredity is the main cause of Tourette's, but researchers think that infections and stress may also play a role.

3D mammography can detect more tumours than conventional techniques

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis produces a three-dimensional image of the breast and can detect 34 per cent more tumours, shows new study.

PTSD patients show more signs of inflammation after psychotherapy

People with post-traumatic stress disorder often have signs of inflammation in the body. But even though psychotherapy reduced their stress level, the inflammation became worse, shows new study.