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Parents with young children most vulnerable after stroke

We think of stroke as an old-age problem, but 25 per cent of strokes happen in individuals under 65.

Children are less active and have higher blood pressure at full moon

The lunar cycle seems to have an effect on children’s health and activity levels, but scientists are at a loss when it comes to finding an explanation for this.

Myths surrounding single women seeking donor-sperm busted

Single women seeking to have a baby by donor sperm are dreaming of the same thing as other women who are trying to conceive: a family.

MMR vaccine: Science exposes the biggest myths

The MMR vaccine has been accused of many things, from containing mercury to triggering autism. Here we look at four of the most serious claims and separate fact from fiction.

How different are we on the inside?

We vary quite a lot on the inside and that can be a blessing. For instance, if you have a large liver you can save more than one life.

Eating more eggs may reduce risk of diabetes

Researchers followed a group of men for 20 years and found health benefits from eating eggs – a controversial food when it comes to health issues.

Football helps male cancer patients recover

Male cancer patients rarely participate in rehabilitation programs, preferring to leave the health care system as soon as possible. Fortunately, football is an attractive alternative to these traditional rehabilitation services.

New material can restore the body's damaged tissue

Researchers have developed a new material that allows the body to generate new tissue by itself.

New study could change the treatment of blood clots

Doctors find new method to treat patients with blood clots in the heart that reduces risk of death by 44 per cent.

Too much vitamin D can damage your heart

High vitamin D concentration in the blood is linked to a greater risk of dying from a heart attack.

Well-educated men live seven years longer

Men with more years of schooling can expect to live seven years longer on average than men who only have a minimum compulsory education. The comparable difference for women is five years.

Scientists can now predict breast cancer in four out of five cases

New method can predict breast cancer two to five years before it occurs.

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