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15 weeks of high-intensity swimming can help prevent diabetes

Short bursts of high-intensity swimming prevents type 2 diabetes in middle-aged women, shows new research.

The world’s largest bacterial study of baby poo

Daily samples of baby poo taken throughout a full year will reveal how the bacterial community changes in the gut of infants.

Fitness targeted in school gym classes

Raising pulses and preventing obesity in gym class are becoming more important than gaining motor skills. A professor strongly opposes to this.

Mice experiments explain how addiction changes our brains

Experiments on mice show that drug abuse leads to permanent changes in the brain. Meet one of the scientists who is trying to reverse this damage and treat addictive behaviour.

Poor dental health tied to heart disease

Untreated root tip infections can raise the risk of coronary disease according to a new study.

Scientist: Hypotheses on antioxidants are complete nonsense

Eating antioxidants in fruits and vegetables does not help combat free radicals in the body or fight disease, but they do help stimulate the body's defences.

Grip strength can indicate your cause of death

Elderly people who still have a firm grip might have a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, strokes and various accidents, according to a Norwegian study.

Why is mental illness so hard on the heart?

Studies have shown that serious depression is as lethal as smoking. Swedish researchers now think they are closer to understanding why.

Being unfit nearly as harmful as smoking

Poor physical fitness amounts to nearly as high a risk of premature death as tobacco smoking and appears to be more lethal than hypertension and cholesterol.

How hereditary is prostate cancer?

Researchers have examined 50,000 brothers of men with prostate cancer to break down the numbers on the genetic probability of the various forms of the disease.

Three in four couples starting fertility treatment will become pregnant

A new study shows that three quarters of couples that started fertility treatment in Denmark conceived within five years.

Red meat not such a bad thing to eat?

A Norwegian study indicates that the iron in red meat might represent a smaller risk for colon cancer than believed. Surprisingly for many, polyunsaturated fats can also create harmful substances in the intestines.


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