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Baby's gut bacteria might predict obesity

A study of Norwegian children suggests that intestinal bacteria composition at age two correlates closely with weight gain later in childhood.

More people suffer from heart attacks in bad weather: study

But scientists do not know if bad weather on its own is the culprit. We might simply engage in activities that result in more heart attacks, such as shovelling snow.

Acne bacteria survive by feasting on their hosts

Acne causing bacteria feed on a type of carbohydrate in the body, called N-glycans. It could help explain why acne can be so resistant to treatment.

Scientists identify genes associated with Tourette syndrome

Heredity is the main cause of Tourette's, but researchers think that infections and stress may also play a role.

3D mammography can detect more tumours than conventional techniques

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis produces a three-dimensional image of the breast and can detect 34 per cent more tumours, shows new study.

PTSD patients show more signs of inflammation after psychotherapy

People with post-traumatic stress disorder often have signs of inflammation in the body. But even though psychotherapy reduced their stress level, the inflammation became worse, shows new study.

Computer game addiction is now a diagnosis

OPINION: Who’s decision to classify game addiction as a mental disorder could negatively impact the most vulnerable in society.

An enlightened approach to “illegal” drugs will revolutionise medicine and science

OPINION: Let logic prevail! It is time for all countries to review their support of the current UN approach to recreational drug control and allow medical research on illegal substances.

When feeling sick feels great: New study reveals a close link between reward and unease

A recent study shows how mice can be made to prefer sickness, nausea, and stress over feeling well, just be removing one specific receptor from the brain. This could open the door to new treatments against various types of malaise associated with disease.

Children who stutter should get help as early as possible

One in ten pre-school children has a stutter. The sooner they get help, the more likely they are to overcome it.

ID checks and stronger parental controls may be driving down teenage drinking habits

Young people in the Nordics are drinking less than they did a few decades ago. Finnish researchers think that this may be due to better controls — both by parents and by those who sell and serve alcohol.

People inflict the most complicated forms of trauma

Victims of a terrifying event perpetrated by another person are more likely to suffer from chronic pain than those who suffer a car accident, fire, or natural disaster, where no perpetrator was involved.

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