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Drugs that didn’t keep their promise

The medicines were called “disease-modifying” because they were supposed to slow down the disease itself. But earlier medications for arthritis didn’t do this. Several of them, however, had dangerous side effects. Why did patients take them anyway?

Some schizophrenia patients can cope without medication

New study challenges our understanding of schizophrenia as a chronic disease that requires lifelong treatment.

Gut bacteria could one day combat obesity

New research shows that the right combination of gut bacteria plays a role in whether people are fat or thin.

Migraines eased by chiropractic? Probably the placebo effect

A visit to the chiropractor might help your migraine. But other treatments work equally well, a new Norwegian study shows.

Breakthrough in fight against debilitating childhood disease

Scientists have discovered a defect in a protein in the brain that results in the debilitating disease dystonia. The disease causes loss of control of movements and violent seizures.

Cancer mystery in Norway

Why does a Norwegian woman have nearly double the risk of colorectal cancer as her female counterparts in nearby Finland? Researchers have no idea.

Candle particles might be just as harmful as diesel fumes

Particles from candles look to be just as harmful to mice as diesel particles. Studies of the effect on people is needed, say scientists.

These are our sleep habits

Norwegian researchers have asked compatriots about their sleep habits. Here are seven findings from their study. Are you in the same groove?

Indestructible bacteria threaten cancer patients

Cancer patients may die from infections as antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to spread. The Norwegian Cancer Society is now fighting unnecessary antibiotic use.

Vitamin D can boost immune system’s fight against one of the world’s biggest killers

New study shows how vitamin D could help millions of people who are currently at risk of contracting tuberculosis. But more studies are needed, say scientists.

Breaking through brain’s defence to let in meds

The mystical blood-brain barrier protects the brain like a sentry, making it difficult to get through with vital life-saving medications. Uppsala Professor Christer Betsholtz is trying to find the key needed to enter.

What works best for back pain?

Your back is robust and you should use it. This is the message that many back patients are hearing from their doctor today. But is that enough? Do they recover more quickly if they receive more treatment, like physical therapy?

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