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Many men needlessly tested for prostate cancer

Doctors often retest men for prostate cancer, even though the first test showed no signs of cancer. This is pointless and debases male patients, say scientists.

3-D printed organs may solve organ donation shortages

It was just 10 months ago that a research team at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in the US reported that they had printed out an ear made from living cartilage cells.

Male circumcision greatly increases risk of urinary tract problems

Circumcised boys are 16-26 times more likely to develop urinary tract problems, shows new research.

Sea snail poison holds key to new diabetes medicine

Sea snails use a quick-acting insulin to kill fish, which could be developed into an effective treatment for diabetes.

Malaria vaccine halts spread of cancer

Scientists have successfully used a malaria vaccine to neutralise sugars on the surface of cancer cells, preventing cancer from spreading throughout the body.

Scientists close to a cure for sickle cell anaemia

A new cure for sickle cell anaemia could be on the way following a breakthrough in CRISPR technology

Pre-eclampsia increases risk of asthma in childhood

New research shows that children whose mothers suffer from pre-eclampsia during pregnancy are more likely to develop asthma later in life.

Lactic acid bacteria combat a common dental disease

Over half of all Norwegians over the age of 40 have periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease which can make teeth loosen and fall out. Lactic acid bacteria might be used in treating the disease.

Cycle like the Scandinavians for a healthier society

Cycling to and from work can reduce the risk factors associated with heart disease. So do it like Denmark and get on your bike, say scientists.

How much should you drink when you're sick?

Not all infections necessitate a greater intake of fluids than usual.

Four years later: is CO2 making us fat?

In 2012 a group of scientists proposed a hypothesis that CO2 in the atmosphere is making us fat. We’ve checked in with the scientists to see what developments they’ve made.

Using our body’s immune system to fight cancer

Immunotherapy can prolong the lives of some cancer patients. Researcher Johanna Olweus explains how it works and why it currently only works for a few kinds of cancer.

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