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No link between MMR vaccine and autism

Another study confirms that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella does not lead to autism.

Crosswords, knitting and gardening lower the risk of Alzheimer's

Physical activity can prevent dementia in the elderly. But activities that stimulate the brain, such as reading, going to concerts or weeding the garden, also lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease regardless of how much physical activity the person does, a Swedish study says.

Preemies given extra nutrition grew faster but got more infections

Premature, very low birth weight babies often have lower IQs and more learning disabilities than their normal-weight peers. But more nutrition early on may help, new research suggests.

Older Swedes drink more — and are more prone to accidents, disease

Twenty-seven per cent of 75-year-old Swedish men and 10 per cent of 75-year-old Swedish women are considered to be hazardous drinkers, a new report says. Elderly people are more sensitive to alcohol than younger people and therefore are more at risk from drinking-related problems.

Professors with advice to inactive people: Football is good for your health

But if you want to play football rather than taking medicine, the advice is that you will need to keep playing and only do it after consulting with your doctor.

Internet therapy for sleep problems provides long-term improvement

An online treatment programme for insomnia works well, with its beneficial effects persisting as long as 18 months after treatment, a new study shows.

Your sick leave infects your colleagues, too

Norway requires a general practitioner to certify an employee’s sick leave if he or she will be absent from work for more than three days.

Chronic fatigue syndrome: Promising four-day treatment

A Norwegian study of an intensive coping course for people with chronic fatigue syndrome showed some promise, but both researchers and scientists involved in the study say it has clear limitations.

Today’s 50-somethings may live until they are 90

If you are around age 50 today, you can expect to live a good deal longer than your parents did. Today's 40-year-olds, 30-year-olds and 20-year-olds will live even longer.

Young people with past behavioural problems get high more

Significantly more teenagers use alcohol and drugs if they’ve had behavioural problems as children, reports a recent study.

Your risk of a deadly cancer is linked to your blood type

People with different blood types have different risks of developing pancreatic cancer, Norwegian research shows.

Are all cancer cells the same?

Not necessarily. And being able to identify the differences at a genetic level could lead to more effective, personalised treatments.

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