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Uncharted area of the brain discovered

Researchers have unveiled a previously unknown area of the brain, a discovery which could lead to new kinds of psychiatric drugs.

Your face reveals what you are eating

New research links facial expressions to the taste of what we eat. In the future it will be difficult to conceal what we actually think food tastes like.

Mums are main key to healthy kids

Fresh figures show that mothers mean more for young Norwegians’ health choices than fathers do, and that parents’ level of education is a crucial factor regarding healthy consumption.

The farmhouse protects against asthma and allergies

Children who grow up on farms are only half as likely to become asthmatic and allergic as city kids, a new study suggests.

Male circumcision leads to a bad sex life

Circumcised men have more difficulties reaching orgasm, and their female partners experience more vaginal pains and an inferior sex life, a new study shows.

Simulations can foresee cerebral haemorrhage

Newly developed simulations are able tell us whether or not a brain aneurism needs to be treated. The lethal bulges can soon be discovered by listening to the eye.

Fast cyclists live longer

It pays to pedal hard when cycling from A to B. Doing so can extend your life by up to five years, say researchers.

Does light really put us in a good mood?

On average, Danes spend all but four hours of their day indoors. But what effect does this really have on their state of mind? The answer is just around the corner.

Alcohol reduces the risk of asthma

If you drink a small amount of alcohol every week, you have a lower risk of developing asthma.

Hypnosis makes multitasking a breeze

People with brain damage can become better at performing multiple tasks by using hypnosis, new studies indicate.

Doctors get hangovers from night work

Night work leaves doctors fatigued, uneasy and unfocused, a new hospital survey reveals. Researchers fear these 'hangovers' could affect the patients.

The hard road off the sofa

Type 2 diabetics struggle to adjust their lifestyles and habits in keeping with medical recommendations. Patient groups could be the answer.