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Diesel fumes can affect a foetus for generations

Diesel engine particles can make DNA mutate over generations, mouse trials show. Humans may also be affected.

Women get the worst hangovers

Women experience more hangovers than men, a study shows. It also indicates that we should eat while we drink and that we readily drink more than the authorities recommend.

Screening for breast cancer to what effect?

Researchers are disagreeing on whether the Norwegian screening program on breast cancer has had the intended effect.

Free play more important than organised sport

If children are to have more exercise, they should not join sports clubs. Instead, they should have more facilities for free play in school playgrounds, a PhD project shows.

Surgery gives you jetlag

The inner clock of patients who undergo surgery is disrupted in the same way as when flying eastwards over several time zones. This jetlag stresses their already severely tried bodies enough to be life-threatening.

Few opt for caesareans

Norwegian women are not too posh to push. Most wish to give birth vaginally. Those who request caesarean sections have good reasons to do so.

Malaria vaccine offers hope for women in Africa

A team of medical parasitologists has reconstructed a vital part of a malaria protein. The breakthrough has led to a promising prototype vaccine for maternal malaria.

Why you always have room for dessert

No matter how stuffed you are after the main course you always have room for a little dessert. Here’s a scientific explanation for the phenomenon some people call the “dessert stomach”.

Nicotine worsens processing ability

Nicotine gives you a kick-start, but the benefit stops there. New research shows that nicotine affects our information processing ability in several ways.

Genetic clues to MS win research prize

A major breakthrough in multiple sclerosis research secured the top prize at the Danish Research Awards 2011.

ECGs lead to fewer heart operations

An electrocardiogram (ECG) can be used to predict the course of an individual patient’s disease, resulting in fewer operations, new study shows.

Frequent sex can prevent pregnancy complications

Having sex more often can reduce the risk of developing a serious medical condition called pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. Sperm contains a special protein that increases the chances for a successful pregnancy.