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Major gender gap in health research

Women’s bodies are different from men’s. We need to understand women’s health better, says medical doctor and professor Johanne Sundby.

Should bicycle helmets be mandatory?

New research shows that cyclists reduce their risk of head injuries by 60 percent when they wear helmets, but experts wrangle on the question of making them mandatory by law.

Football is a winning treatment for elderly people with prediabetes

Playing football is great for your health and could even stave off type 2 diabetes. New study in the Faroe Islands reveals improvements in overall health among middle-aged and elderly prediabetic men and women who enjoy a regular kickabout.

Here’s why firefighters don’t get burned out

In spite of encountering stressful situations, firefighters have good coping strategies that keep them healthy and protect them from burnout, a new study shows.

Is it bad to sleep in on the weekends?

A large study suggests that a few extra hours of sleep on the weekend are probably not detrimental to your health.

Intestinal bacteria can work better than antibiotics

A small Norwegian study suggests that transplanted bowel bacteria may be more effective than antibiotics in treating patients with severe bowel infections.

How do we make sure that all have access to personalized medicine?

Personalized medicine demands much from the patient. But researchers warn that tomorrow’s health care, with all its promise, is at risk of unfairly excluding people unless we take steps to prevent this.

Fake researcher fabricated finding that HPV vaccine causes cervical cancer

A research article alleging that HPV vaccines can cause cancer has now been withdrawn. "Extremely serious," says Karolinska Institutet.

Self-admissions can improve patients’ ability to manage their illness

Danish psychiatric patients have been able to admit themselves to the psychiatric ward since 2014. It gives them a sense of safety and a better quality of life.

Voluntary admissions do not reduce coercion among psychiatric patients

Psychiatric patients in Denmark can decide when to admit themselves to hospital. The idea was to reduce coercion, but new evidence indicates it has little to no effect.

Can birth control pills make teens depressed?

A Swedish study shows that hormone-based contraceptives are associated with an increased use of antidepressants among young girls.

Tips for people who want to start training — and stick with it

Be patient, find an activity you think is fun, don’t start off too hard at the beginning, and remember why you wanted to start exercising in the first place. Those are among researchers’ suggestions for those who want to make exercise a habit.

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