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Breastfeeding does not prevent asthma and allergies

A Swedish study shows that breastfeeding does not lower the risk of allergies, hay fever and asthma.

Patient inclusion is key to fixing health inequality

A new study investigates how inequality affects patient treatment and experiences.

Asthma might weaken the body’s immune system

Individuals with asthma suffer more infections and should be under greater medical supervision, says scientist behind new study.

Nurses biased against obese patients

An increasing number of patients entering intensive care units in Norwegian hospitals are obese. Some hospital personnel find it hard to muster the same amount of empathy and provide the same level of care they give to slimmer patients.

Another tick-borne disease to worry about

Authorities don’t know how many Norwegians have been infected with the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis.

Rising number of Swedish women suffer recurrent miscarriages

A new Swedish study indicates that a rising number of women have experienced three or more miscarriages in a row. The medical researchers are uncertain as to the cause.

Is e-cycling good exercise?

Using an e-bike instead of a car is obviously a contribution to a better environment and less climate change. But do e-bikes also promote health or do their electric motors make everything too easy?

New tool can track resistant malaria at unprecedented speed and detail

Scientists have discovered a smart way to monitor the spread of resistant malaria parasites.

Bowel disease in childhood raises cancer risks

People who suffered Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis before the age of 18 have twice the risk of developing cancer, according to a Swedish study.

World’s largest sex study under way in Denmark

Up to 200,000 people to help scientists reveal how sex impacts our health.

Scientists surprised to find bacteria inside fallopian tubes and around ovaries

Bacteria may affect women’s fertility and the health of unborn children

Scientists can finally explain how autoimmune disease spreads

“It’s a negative spiral,” says scientist behind new study.