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Not so hygge: Cosy lighting prevents elderly people reading in winter

A Norwegian study shows that the homes of 75 year olds are too dark for comfortable reading, despite their living rooms containing on average fifteen different lights.

More children in Europe have started smoking

More young people under the age of 15 are taking up smoking, bucking the trend among adults and those over 15 where the number of new smokers has gradually declined since the 1990's.

Here's a mental health workout that's as simple as ABC

The Act-Belong-Commit approach promotes keeping active, building stronger relationships with friends, family and community groups, and committing to hobbies, challenges, and meaningful causes.

Breakthrough: How the brain keeps track of time

Norwegian scientists Edvard and May-Britt Moser were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their studies on sense of direction. Now they have found the brain cells that place our memories in the right order.

What are the links between exhaust fumes and heart disease?

Several major studies around the globe show that people living in areas with air pollution are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. Norwegian researchers have examined potential causes.

Double the number of children born to women over the age of 45

Scandinavian women are waiting longer to have children. Last year in Norway, 138 women over age 45 had children – twice as many as ten years earlier, according to figures from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.

Swedish youth prescribed more anxiety medications

Use of medications for anxiety, insomnia and epilepsy has increased significantly in Sweden among children and adolescents, a new study shows.

Considering knee surgery? Read this first

About two out of ten people who undergo the procedure do not experience any pain relief at all and may actually be worse off after surgery than they were before.

Greenlandic children are getting taller and healthier

The general health of Greenlandic children now appears to be as good as that of their European peers. And perhaps even better. New studies show that compared with Danish children, they are no longer characterised as short and have similar patterns of disease.

Diabetes patients can reduce their risk of heart failure by 70 per cent

21-year-long research project shows the difference it makes when doctors initiate intensive treatment of diabetes patients.

How necessary is the world’s most common shoulder operation?

Patients who received surgical treatment for shoulder impingement fared no better than patients receiving placebo treatment.

Ouija board study highlights ineffective treatment for autism

Facilitated communication is still a widely used technique even though studies have shown that it does not work. A new study into Ouija boards indicates why.

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