Health - latest news

Syndicate content

New research project sets its sights on cure for heart failure

Modern medicine can only slow down development of heart failure, but not prevent it. New project aims to change that.

Scientists catalogue all human proteins

New protein catalogue will be key instrument in the development of new types of medicine.

Are we growing overweight from baker’s yeast?

The type of yeast that is used to leaven bread is also used to fatten animals. A new study points toward a possible link between human obesity and yeast.

How our last weapon against MRSA could easily fail

Treatment with one type of antibiotic can severely decrease effectiveness of other antibiotics.

Our bodies are riddled with useless genes

New study finds abundance of "junk" genes in the human genome.

Scientists are mapping the entire Danish genome

A world first, scientists have mapped 30 individual genomes completely from scratch.

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are everywhere

Nasty superbugs – bacteria resistant to nearly every antibiotic – are not just found in chicken fillets. They can be anywhere, from your kitchen counter to the local creek. There’s no way to know if you're carrying them around inside you, either. Not until you're in trouble.

Schizophrenia and severe depression share biological process defect

Some of the most severe mental illnesses share the same defective coding of biological processes down to the cellular level.

Poor work environment linked to heart troubles

Men who recently experienced a heart attack think their work environment contributed to their cardiovascular problems.

Smoking gene could be causing weight increase in non-smokers

New study suggests relationship between smoking genes and increased weight.

Body sensor reacts to chili and chilly

One of the body’s cold sensors reacts as well to frigid air as to a hot chili pepper.

Snus smokeless tobacco can lead to smoking

Teenagers who use the moist powder tobacco – snus – tend to have low self-esteem and are more at risk of starting to smoke, one study finds. But researchers disagree.