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Special gene is causing some smokers to stay slim

Heavy smokers are slimmer than smokers who lack a specific gene, shows new study with 80,000 participants.

Dentists could soon be fixing your teeth with cement

Research on a new material to fill dental cavities takes a small step forward.

Chemical cocktails in foods increase cancer risk

The risk of getting cancer from carcinogens increases dramatically when the substances are mixed.

Environmental toxins affect infant growth rates

PCB and DDE exposure in the womb or in breast milk can alter the growth development of a child, according to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

Chemical pollution is causing brain damage in polar bears

Toxic chemicals end up in the Arctic where they cause brain damage in polar bears. They could even affect humans, scientists warn.

Whooping cough once a childhood killer

He turned blue from coughing, and his mother was sure that he had died. Pertussis killed many children in the 1940s. After most children were vaccinated, it was virtually eliminated as a killer.

Treatment during the embryo stage can help haemophiliacs

Some haemophiliacs develop immunity to their treatment. New study aims to change that.

Can HIV be eradicated?

Scientists set out to eliminate HIV entirely from the body.

Chronically ill are major consumers of alternative medicine

Half of questioned patients turned to alternative treatments to improve their health, study shows.

Decreasing painkiller use lowers symptoms of depression and anxiety

Reducing painkiller consumption reduces pain and symptoms of depression and anxiety, new research shows.

Breast cancer risk higher in women who need reproductive help

The first test tube baby in Norway was born in 1984. An increasing number of women rely on assisted reproduction to give birth. Today, between 2-5 per cent of all children born in Europe are brought into the world this way.

A virus from horses is bringing us closer to a vaccine against Hepatitis C

A Hepatitis C-like virus in horses could be used for developing a vaccine against the real thing.