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Lifestyle affects cancer risk, but the biggest risk is getting old

Old age is not for the weak of heart: Nine out of ten cases of cancer occur after we reach the age of 50, new numbers from the Norwegian Cancer Registry show.

Baby's gut bacteria might predict obesity

A study of Norwegian children suggests that intestinal bacteria composition at age two correlates closely with weight gain later in childhood.

More people suffer from heart attacks in bad weather: study

But scientists do not know if bad weather on its own is the culprit. We might simply engage in activities that result in more heart attacks, such as shovelling snow.

Women excel at hiding autism

But this can cause health problems in the long run.

Acne bacteria survive by feasting on their hosts

Acne causing bacteria feed on a type of carbohydrate in the body, called N-glycans. It could help explain why acne can be so resistant to treatment.

Scientists identify genes associated with Tourette syndrome

Heredity is the main cause of Tourette's, but researchers think that infections and stress may also play a role.

3D mammography can detect more tumours than conventional techniques

Digital Breast Tomosynthesis produces a three-dimensional image of the breast and can detect 34 per cent more tumours, shows new study.

PTSD patients show more signs of inflammation after psychotherapy

People with post-traumatic stress disorder often have signs of inflammation in the body. But even though psychotherapy reduced their stress level, the inflammation became worse, shows new study.

Computer game addiction is now a diagnosis

OPINION: Who’s decision to classify game addiction as a mental disorder could negatively impact the most vulnerable in society.

An enlightened approach to “illegal” drugs will revolutionise medicine and science

OPINION: Let logic prevail! It is time for all countries to review their support of the current UN approach to recreational drug control and allow medical research on illegal substances.

When feeling sick feels great: New study reveals a close link between reward and unease

A recent study shows how mice can be made to prefer sickness, nausea, and stress over feeling well, just be removing one specific receptor from the brain. This could open the door to new treatments against various types of malaise associated with disease.

Children who stutter should get help as early as possible

One in ten pre-school children has a stutter. The sooner they get help, the more likely they are to overcome it.