Environment - latest news

Syndicate content

Eels can escape the Mediterranean Sea

Electronic tags reveal that eels can and do make it out of the Mediterranean Sea to reach their breeding grounds in the Atlantic.

Scientists: Deep-sea fish can solve world food shortages

There is a lot of food hiding in the deep ocean and it could help feed the entire world. But we must take care not to overfish, marine scientists warn.

Manure can spread antibiotic resistance

Manure from farm stables can promote genes in bacteria that help make them resistant to antibiotics, shows new study.

Bacteria can make your bacon sandwich climate friendly

New project attempts to replace soy proteins with proteins from methane-eating bacteria to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Scientists: Rewilding is a Pandora’s box

Scientists speak out against rewilding projects, where lost species are reintroduced into the wild.

Why are banned chemicals still killing killer whales?

Levels of toxic PCBs in some whale and dolphin species are now so high that it could mark the end for one of Europe’s top predators.

Top four ocean threats according to marine scientists

Overfishing, global warming, waste and contamination, and ocean acidification are at the forefront of scientists concerns.

New model can help predict flooding two days in advance

A new model can monitor underground water in real-time and will help to improve early flood warnings.

Plants could be unreliable for us as carbon sinks

A new technique reveals how the metabolism of terrestrial plants has increased– and can decrease – with rising atmospheric CO2 levels.

COP21 agreement is unclear and unrealistic: scientists

While world leaders are still patting themselves on the back over the new climate deal, scientists begin to voice their concerns.

COP21: Still far away from a two degree global warming limit

The world holds its breath as 150 world leaders attempt to negotiate a deal to limit global warming. What have they agreed on so far?

The valley at the end of the world – and the magical mysteries we found there

OPINION: Plant life in parts of the high Arctic are changing fast, possibly due to changing climate and local bird populations, but scientists are still putting the pieces of the puzzle together.