Environment - latest news

Syndicate content

Enter the eco-cow

Preparations have started on the breeding of a more climate-friendly cow which calves less frequently and produces milk over a longer period.

Geology behind mass extermination

New study challenges the established view that a sudden climate change caused a sharp reduction in the number of animal species.

Factoring sheep into climate calculations?

Tree rings in many regions could be more affected by hungry herbivores than by temperatures. This should be taken into account in calculations of historic climate.

Origins of animal life remain a mystery

For 520 million years, a goldmine of fossils has remained untouched beneath northern Greenland, hiding secrets about the development of animal life on our planet. A new expedition to the area may reveal these secrets.

Winds extend the life of the Arctic icecap

The wind plays a much more important role in climate change than previously thought, say Danish researchers, who have mapped the summer ice in the Arctic Ocean going back thousands of years

Air-traffic shutdown justified

Last year’s closing of flight zones due to the eruption of Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull was justified, considering the potential damage from the ash, a new study concludes.

Warm sea currents caused the melting of Greenland’s ice

It was the sea temperature, rather than the air temperature, that determined how fast Greenland’s ice cap melted at the end of the last ice age. This discovery is important for today's research into ice melt

Global warming won't make plants grow any faster

Climate change will likely not result in increased plant growth as once thought. A new Danish research project shows that future periods of drought will limit growth – and that is bad news for the climate.

Suburbanites are climate villains

Who are the most eco-friendly, rural people or city people? Whatever the answer, if you are climate conscious you should stay clear of the suburbs.

Yo-Yo dieter with eiderdown

The common eider is a yo-yo dieter. This can make the sea duck vulnerable to environmental toxins and disease both on the Svalbard Archipelago and along the Norwegian coast.

Jobs

Follow ScienceNordic on: