Environment - latest news

Syndicate content

Dramatic changes in Arctic food chain

The collapse of Greenland’s lemming population cycle has disastrous consequences for a number of predators.

Alarming loss of biodiversity in protected areas

The natural environment is in a far worse state than feared, according to the most comprehensive study so far of conditions in a large number of protected tropical forests.

A cup of coffee with biodiversity and clean drinking water, please

OPINION: Sales of clean water, CO2 credits and the protection of biodiversity can benefit the environment and provide an extra income for farmers who grow coffee under the shade of trees.

Thawing permafrost emits more carbon than expected

Thawed Arctic permafrost emits more greenhouse gases to the atmosphere than scientists have thought. This can have frightening consequences, warns a researcher.

Oilfields have reduced their methane emissions

Capturing methane-rich natural gas from oilfields has helped ensure that emissions of methane have been far lower than expected, a new study shows.

Harvesting energy from all forms of sunlight

By simply cutting UV photons in two, we could get twice the amount of energy from sunlight.

Hydrogen sulphide and lack of oxygen stifled early life

After the Triassic geological period gave way to the Jurassic, life was almost impossible on the seabed in coastal waters. The water here lacked oxygen but was rich in toxic hydrogen sulphide.

Research gives clean drinking water for millions of Vietnamese

Geological studies carried out by Danish researchers are giving hope to the millions of people in Southeast Asia who drink groundwater contaminated by arsenic – a highly poisonous substance.

Use nature while protecting it

Local businesses would like to make the wilderness more accessible to tourists, whereas conservationists are focused on protecting it pristinely. Norwegian researchers think you can have both.

Aerial photos from Greenland topple climate models

Greenland’s ice sheet is not behaving as scientists have expected, and the climate models must be revised, new research suggests.

The passive housing revolution

Seventy percent cuts in carbon emissions and 75 percent cuts in energy consumption by 2050? Passive house technology could make it happen.

Trapping carbon with iron

Iron fertilising of the oceans can make plankton draw more carbon dioxide down to the seabed for long-term storage.

Follow ScienceNordic on: