Environment - latest news

Syndicate content

Only minor effects on fertility from environmental contaminants

Environmental contaminants cause less harm to human reproduction than feared, concludes EU study.

Ocean acidification puts Norway in a pickle

Research since the last IPPC climate change report has provided further proof of mounting acidification of the oceans. Norwegian experts think the fifth IPPC assessment report, to be released in Stockholm this week, should be an eye-opener.

Norway funds four green longshots

Giant batteries for storing renewable energy and solar cells that can use more of the light spectrum are among the winning projects that have been awarded additional funding from the Research Council of Norway.

How algae slime impacts the climate

Algae in the sea ice around the Arctic and the Antarctic convert CO2 into micro-gels. This makes it possible to see whether this cold slime actually counteracts climate change.

Climate change fills polar bears with toxins

The melting ice around Greenland has changed the polar bear’s diet. This means that they are being filled with large quantities of environmental poisons, and that forms a threat to the polar bear’s existence.

Greenland icebergs may have triggered the Younger Dryas

Just as the last Ice Age was drawing to a close, Greenland icebergs changed the temperature in the Atlantic and triggered a 1,000-year-long extension of the Ice Age.

Bison may boost Danish vegetation

A new study sets out to clarify what effect the reintroduction of bison will have on the Danish countryside. The bison may open up for a more diverse flora, says researcher.

Microscopic arms race rages on the seabed

The ocean floor contains viruses and bacteria locked in a constant struggle for survival. This has a great effect on the carbon cycle in the ocean and thus also affects how much CO2 is released into the atmosphere.

Remarkable climate details in Antarctic ice core

An ice core extracted from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet reveals in unprecedented detail how the weather in the Antarctic has changed over the past 68,000 years. The ice core may also tell us how future climate change will affect the frozen continent.

Enduring climate crisis by gene doubling

Ancient grains of pollen show how conifers survived one of the Earth’s greatest mass extinctions.

The well-heeled leave biggest carbon footprint

A new study shows that more affluent households have a greenhouse gas effect from travel and transport that is 250 times greater than individuals in the lowest economic classes of society.

Wet tundra can also capture carbon

Do permafrost thaws and bacteria comprise a climate bomb in the Arctic?

Follow ScienceNordic on:

What others are reading