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Changing climate can change building standards

Roofs in Norway have to be built to hold up under heavy loads of snow. But a warmer climate and less snow might mean a change in building standards for roofs that have to be built to last a century.

Unstable Atlantic can accelerate climate change

A warmer planet can destabilise an important oceanographic process in the North Atlantic called deep water formation. If deep water formation is affected, it will have a profound impact on global climate and precipitation.

Even tiny oil spills may break Arctic food chain

Drilling for oil in the Arctic may have catastrophic consequences, new study suggests.

Huge meltwater reservoir found under Greenland ice

A reservoir of meltwater the size of Ireland has been found within Greenland’s ice sheet. The reservoir may increase the melting of the inland ice in the future and provides fundamental new insights into the dynamics of the Greenland ice cap.

Saving butterfly meadows

They are hit hard by modern land management, but butterflies can be saved by simple practical measures.

How archaeology helps wild reindeer

Archaeological finds left by prehistoric hunters offer today's biologists invaluable tools for understanding how reindeer once roamed Norway's landscape - unimpeded by roads, power lines or other infrastructure.

OPINION: Should India invest in Arctic oil?

In an unusual twist of events, the second most populous country in the world has become an unlikely player in the far flung Arctic high north.

Less ice in Greenland 3,000 years ago than today

A new method for dating ancient sea shells reveals that the Greenland Ice Sheet was smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago than it is today. The new study also indicates that the inland ice is more robust than previously thought.

The best way to remove substances from rainwater

Is rainwater clean? Can it be harmful to aquatic life? And what happens when rainwater from cities is discharged to the aquatic environment?

Wood fuels far less climate friendly than assumed

Burning wood or biofuels taken from slow-growing forests may actually be worse in terms of CO2 emissions than burning fossil fuels, new research suggests.

Warmer in Southern Europe, wetter in the North

European scientists have joined forces in a report to politicians. This is what we can expect of extreme weather in times ahead.

Surviving ash trees help to address evolutionary riddle

A pathogenic fungus is killing thousands of European ash trees every year. Danish researchers are now trying to uncover the genetics behind the unknown defence mechanism in ash trees. Not only to save the ash trees, but also to address an evolutionary mystery in trees.

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