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Aerosols are wild cards in climate models

Tiny airborne particles in the Earth’s atmosphere affect its climate. But uncertainties regarding their impact can be greater than reckoned in climate models, according to new Norwegian research.

Measuring snowfall in windy mountain areas

A new statistical model may finally give meteorologists a better handle on snowfall amounts, even when measurements are made where snow is blown wildly into drifts. This information can boost hydropower efficiency as well as help us better understand climate change.

More heavy rains in the future

Increasingly powerful cloudbursts can wreak havoc in cities. Better measurements and climate models can help urban planners protect cities from wetter, wilder weather.

Tiny microplastics a marine headache

Food packaging. Drink bottles. Electronics. Children’s toys. Plastics make modern life possible, but they have a dark side. Plastics in the ocean break down into microscopic fragments that zooplankton not only eat, but pass up the food chain, a Finnish research team has shown.

Changing climate can change building standards

Roofs in Norway have to be built to hold up under heavy loads of snow. But a warmer climate and less snow might mean a change in building standards for roofs that have to be built to last a century.

Unstable Atlantic can accelerate climate change

A warmer planet can destabilise an important oceanographic process in the North Atlantic called deep water formation. If deep water formation is affected, it will have a profound impact on global climate and precipitation.

Even tiny oil spills may break Arctic food chain

Drilling for oil in the Arctic may have catastrophic consequences, new study suggests.

Huge meltwater reservoir found under Greenland ice

A reservoir of meltwater the size of Ireland has been found within Greenland’s ice sheet. The reservoir may increase the melting of the inland ice in the future and provides fundamental new insights into the dynamics of the Greenland ice cap.

Saving butterfly meadows

They are hit hard by modern land management, but butterflies can be saved by simple practical measures.

How archaeology helps wild reindeer

Archaeological finds left by prehistoric hunters offer today's biologists invaluable tools for understanding how reindeer once roamed Norway's landscape - unimpeded by roads, power lines or other infrastructure.

OPINION: Should India invest in Arctic oil?

In an unusual twist of events, the second most populous country in the world has become an unlikely player in the far flung Arctic high north.

Less ice in Greenland 3,000 years ago than today

A new method for dating ancient sea shells reveals that the Greenland Ice Sheet was smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago than it is today. The new study also indicates that the inland ice is more robust than previously thought.

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Mapping social responsibility in science

Most scientists want their research to be valuable to society – they just disagree about the definition of what is valuable, new research reveals.