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Global genetic diversity mapped by new study

New method couples genes and geography to produce the first global map of genetic diversity.

Happy salmon swim further

Some salmon are nervous nellies and apprehensive about swimming far out to sea, but not so if they can get a boost from anti-anxiety drugs.

Scientists risk their lives in the wilds of Greenland

Neither snowstorms nor hungry polar bears could keep a group of scientists from studying musk oxen migration in North Greenland.

Scientists trace unknown ocean life from a can of water

Scientists have discovered a new method to map animal life in the deep ocean, using only DNA samples contained in a can of water.

How plants use chemical weapons to protect themselves

Scientists have discovered how plants fend off insects and fungal attacks using chemical poisons like hydrogen cyanide.

Climate change threatens the existence of Arctic musk oxen

Rising temperatures are making Arctic musk oxen struggle so much to find food that their very existence could soon be threatened, say scientists.

A small fly is a super pollinator in the Arctic

VIDEO: An international research group has found that a small cousin of the housefly is responsible for much of the plant pollination in the Arctic.

Ancient crops are the future for our dinner plate

VIDEO: New research project aims to revolutionise the way we eat.

Viking horse breeders developed the ‘ambling gait’

New research shows that we probably have the Vikings to thank for modern horse riding's most comfortable riding style--the ambling gait.

This Arctic town has running water for just four months of the year

GREENLAND: How do you supply running water when it is frozen for most of the year? The Greenlandic town of Qaanaaq has some creative solutions.

A great year for blueberries

Forget those kicks on Route 66, get your thrills on blueberry hills all over Norway, Sweden and Finland! Researchers predict a recordbreaking year for blueberries.

Can you spot the walrus?

GREENLAND: Scientists in Greenland are developing fast and efficient ways to monitor walrus populations in remote locations using high-resolution satellite images. If successful, the technique could be rolled out to other species.