Syndicate content

Forskning.no

Why you should read and train to boost your brain

Exercise and reading create visible changes in the brain, according to research on nuns and rats in luxury cages. The brain can generate new brain cells and neural pathways, offering hope for stroke victims.

No one can "shrug off" bullying at work

A new study punctures the myth that certain people have strong enough mental armour to emerge unscathed from bullying on the job.

Twice as many Norwegian boys as girls start school late

More boys than girls begin school a year late and more girls than boys begin a year early. But researchers are not certain whether maturity is the explanation.

Will climate change affect Norwegian kelp forests in a positive way?

Climate change, including acidification of the oceans, will likely affect many of the plants and animals in our sea and oceans. Fresh research results indicate that kelp could be favoured by some of the changes.

Are mercury dental fillings really that dangerous?

If mercury is unhealthy for us to eat in fish, why is it okay for it to be in dental amalgam in our mouths?

VR doesn’t measure up to nature

Virtual reality can provide nature experiences for some people, but so far the technology isn’t very satisfactory. “Going for a walk" with VR glasses made study participants cyber sick.

More breast cancer among women with benign findings

Women who are called in for more testing after mammography and whose results are then OK are more likely than others to develop breast cancer in the subsequent two years. But the absolute risk remains low.

Household cleaners can be as bad as smoking for your lungs

Cleaners who have regularly used cleaning sprays over 20 years were found to have reduced lung function equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day over the same period.

Can a baby’s smell help with depression?

A newborn’s head has a distinctive smell. Could it be harnessed to treat mental illness? A team of Swedish scientists thinks the idea has promise.

Elderly people with dementia need more physical activity

A new study shows that elderly people with dementia who have good balance, muscular strength and mobility are less likely to suffer from depression.