Syndicate content

Forskning.no

How the last ice age changed Norway

Researchers are learning more about what happened when several thousand metres of ice covered Norway roughly 10 000 years ago.

Norwegian academics face serious work-family life conflicts

Norwegian academics say that their jobs demand such a huge commitment that they don’t have time for their families, a study of workers at three major Norwegian universities has shown.

New insight can lead to better breast cancer treatment

Researchers have now found out what happens when normal cells develop into breast cancer. This finding can lead to more individualized treatment: the right treatment in the right dosage for the right patient.

Tax havens can drive environmental degradation

A new study from Sweden shows how the use of tax havens is indirectly linked to illegal fishing as well as deforestation in the Amazon.

5 reasons why a holiday can boost your workplace creativity

OPINION: Emerging research suggests that taking some time off could be just what you need to boost your creativity at work.

Brexit: Researchers doubt a Norwegian-style EEA solution would work for the UK

For the Norway model, with some kind of EEA-type solution to work for Britain, British politicians must be able to look beyond the traditional political divides, according to researchers.

What are the links between exhaust fumes and heart disease?

Several major studies around the globe show that people living in areas with air pollution are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. Norwegian researchers have examined potential causes.

Double the number of children born to women over the age of 45

Scandinavian women are waiting longer to have children. Last year in Norway, 138 women over age 45 had children – twice as many as ten years earlier, according to figures from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.

The truth is in the sediments

OPINION: The seafloor has different patterns on top than underneath the surface. Researchers at Nord University suggest that new seafloor research in the Lofoten-Vesterålen region contributes to future marine management.

Humans have always caused plant and animal extinctions

Our warming planet is pushing some plant and animals species towards extinction. But there’s actually no such thing as untouched nature — humans have always altered their environment. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do our best to protect what’s here now.