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Evidence uncovered of a 1500-year-old massacre in Sweden

The remains, discovered by researchers, appear to have been left in the same places where they had been slaughtered.

Female leaders are catching up with their male colleagues

In Norway, two in three managers are still men. But researchers think this gender gap will close in one generation.

Chickens do best when they can play, climb and bathe

Chickens play more if they grow up in a varied environment with hay bales to peck at, boxes to climb onto and bedding in which to dust bathe. They become more active and build stronger bones, according to a new study.

The future North Atlantic takes up more carbon than previously expected

Efficient carbon pathway to the deep ocean allows for a strong future uptake, new study shows.

Cancer survivors find going back to work tough

Regardless of their background and occupation, survivors felt that they started working too soon after finishing treatment. But workplace adaptations can help ease the transition.

Bladder cancer more often fatal for women

Women are diagnosed at a more advanced stage of the disease, when the cancer is more likely to have spread, according to a Norwegian study.

Gut bacteria flora linked to chronic heart failure

A new Norwegian study has found that chronic heart failure patients lack important microbiota in their intestinal tracts.

East African farmers are positive to GMOs

Imagine the despair you would feel if your crops were destroyed. Perhaps due to drought, an aggressive plant disease or pests, or nutrient deficient soil? And back at home you have many hungry mouths to feed.

Is it right to destroy monuments over our dark past?

OPINION: Politicians, managers and researchers must be able to use their voices when cultural heritage contributes to discrimination, hatred and violence.

Life was good for Stone Age Norwegians along Oslo Fjord

Southeastern Norway is the most populous part of Norway today. Based on an analysis of more than 150 settlements along Oslo Fjord, the area apparently also appealed to Stone Age people.