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VR doesn’t measure up to nature

Virtual reality can provide nature experiences for some people, but so far the technology isn’t very satisfactory. “Going for a walk" with VR glasses made study participants cyber sick.

More breast cancer among women with benign findings

Women who are called in for more testing after mammography and whose results are then OK are more likely than others to develop breast cancer in the subsequent two years. But the absolute risk remains low.

Household cleaners can be as bad as smoking for your lungs

Cleaners who have regularly used cleaning sprays over 20 years were found to have reduced lung function equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day over the same period.

Can a baby’s smell help with depression?

A newborn’s head has a distinctive smell. Could it be harnessed to treat mental illness? A team of Swedish scientists thinks the idea has promise.

Elderly people with dementia need more physical activity

A new study shows that elderly people with dementia who have good balance, muscular strength and mobility are less likely to suffer from depression.

Nature + nurture = genetic nurture

Sequences of our parents’ genes that are not handed down to us can still shape our lives, according to new Icelandic research.

It matters who your mother is, even for fish

OPINION: New research could result in both bigger and better farmed fish.

Public transport poses problems for those with mental disorders

Many of us experience mental disabilities of one kind or another in the course of life. A new study points out problems this can cause for users of public transport services.

Can you trust “safe periods” as a form of birth control?

It’s a well-known phenomenon that a woman’s body temperature can help predict when she is least — or most —likely to become pregnant. Swedish researchers have studied this phenomenon and are selling a mobile phone app as a form of natural birth control. Their efforts are not without controversy.

Elephants outside the national park are more stressed

The stress levels in elephants living in the areas outside Etosha National Park is higher than in elephants living inside the park.