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Prevention

Many women needlessly take cholesterol-lowering drugs

More than half of middle-aged women who take cholesterol-lowering medicines called 'statins' have neither cardiovascular disease or diabetes, shows new research.

Diabetics greatly benefit from short bursts of high intensity exercise

A group of diabetics lost 18 per cent belly fat and improved their sugar regulation, after just 8-weeks of short but high intensity exercise sessions. No drug has the same effect.

Norwegian polio victims weigh in on vaccine debate

Nearly 10,000 Norwegians who were affected by polio are still alive. As the vaccine debate rampages in the US and in Norway, polio survivors say they think that vaccine opponents put their own and other children’s lives in danger.

Research to prevent future pandemics

What is the connection between parasitic infections and allergies?

Pollen may increase suicide rates

Scientists have established a correlation between pollen count in the air and suicide rates in Denmark.

Hard squeeze of the arm may help stroke victims

New study suggests that patients with acute ischemic stroke might benefit from the hard squeeze of the arm from a blood pressure cuff. Why this helps is anyone’s guess.

HIV epidemic in Greenland mapped in great detail

HIV has been introduced in Greenland at least 25 times, according to new study, which reveals how an HIV epidemic breaks out and spreads in a society. The findings may help prevent future epidemics.

Screening does not prevent aggressive breast cancer

Breast screening does not detect the types of breast cancer that women actually die from sufficiently early, new research reveals. Screening may even lead to overtreatment, which increases the risk of other cancers, argues researcher.

Intensive schizophrenia treatment shows great promise

A new study has looked into the effect of intensive treatment programmes for young people with schizophrenia. The results show that we should stick with the intensive treatment.

Mega magnet to boost brain scans

A new magnet with a magnetic field 140,000 times that of the Earth’s is currently being installed in a Danish hospital. It will be used to scan brain activity and will give scientists new insight into diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, MS and epilepsy.

What will our climate look like in 2050?

Knowing that we have the power to influence global climate is enormously important when trying to imagine what our climate might look like in 2050. To a large degree, it will depend on actions our leaders take now and in the immediate future.