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Physics

Danish physicist stores light, moves it around, and makes it reappear

Renowned physicist Lene Hau does not only know how to stop light, but also manipulate it and save it’s imprints for later use.

Tracking the Earth’s magnetic field in Northern Lights

Physicists are keen on solving the mysteries of the Earth’s magnetic field. Their curiosity has a practical side – when solar storms that create the aurora are bent by the magnetic field, it can affect technologies that modern civilization depends on.

Danish scientists break laser record

New laser technology can be used to diagnose cancer and monitor food quality.

Small capsules – big potential

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints.

All existence on the edge

The entire universe is unstable. Suddenly it could change all its physical game rules. That would be the definitive end of happy hour for humanity.

Atomic-level protection for drivers

A new window on the world of atoms will make future vehicles safer in collisions.

Plastic can convert heat into electricity

Large amounts of energy go to waste due to insufficient heat recovery in power stations. Now scientists have identified special plastic materials that can convert heat into electricity.

When insulators become electronics

A new, superconducting oxide system multiplies the electron mobility in electronic oxide transistors. Benefits include superconducting nanotransistors, self-charging electronic devices and a new type of RAM.

A new path towards quantum computers

The supercomputer of the future operates with quantum bits, but quantum systems are fragile and they degrade easily. Now Danish scientists have managed to turn this degradation into an advantage, making it easier to create the special quantum states required for a quantum computer.

Effective method in quest for new physics

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator smashes protons together with such great force that it can give birth to hitherto unknown particles. A new method makes it easier to recognise the new particles.