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Life

Oxygenated Earth much older than we thought

The discovery of the world’s oldest soil suggests that Earth’s atmosphere contained oxygen as early as three billion years ago. That’s 700 million years earlier than previously thought.

New photos of beautiful nebula

The Danish telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile has captured a striking image of the star-forming nebula NGC 6559. See the beautiful picture and some of the other pictures from the telescope here.

Archeologists burn pigs to investigate historical mystery

Archeologists are puzzled by the fact that bone remnants from children and infants are almost never unearthed from ancient funeral pyre sites.

Bacteria thrive at the bottom of the Mariana Trench

Scientists have found bacteria in one of the world’s most hostile and extreme environments 11 km below sea level.

Live bacteria found deep below the seabed

Scientists have found live microbial communities in the earth’s crust deep below the seabed. The discovery may affect our conception of Earth's orbit.

Living fossil lives only on two rocks

A small herb from the past has miraculously survived on two adjacent vertical cliffs with the help of ants.

Newly discovered planetary system alters our view of planet formation

New data from NASA’s Kepler mission has revealed what was thought to be difficult: a planetary system that orbits around two stars. We need to modify our theories, says Danish astronomer.

Still time to save our plants from climate change

Climate change will cause plant species to disappear more slowly than previously thought. While this gives us time to rescue our plant life, it means we may begin to underestimate the effects of global warming.

Lack of oxygen led to first mass extinction

The first mass extinction of animal life on Earth was previously blamed on a rise in the oxygen concentration in the oceans as a result of a cooler climate. But a new study shows the catastrophe was really caused by a massive decrease in oxygen.

Computer model predicts tomorrow’s nature

Researchers have developed a computer model that can look into the future. The model’s virtual world makes it possible to explore how man-made changes in nature will impact on animal life in the future.