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History

What this coin can tell us about ancient politics

Situated on the coast of present-day Lebanon, the ancient Phoenician city-state of Sidon was in the middle of the crossfire between the Persians, Greeks and Egyptians. A small lump of metal became an important part of their political and economic balancing act.

The king fought for the Norwegian constitution – and his son

Christian Frederick didn’t have the Norwegian people in mind when he defended their constitution. He wanted his own son to assume the throne, claims a researcher.

Counting the years the Viking way

How did Norway keep track of time before it adopted the modern calendar?

Archaeologist discovers a new style of Viking combat

Experimental archaeologists donned their armour and took to the battlefield to test out shield fighting techniques.

A 300-year-old murder could be solved

A skeleton found in a German palace this summer could clear up a missing person case. Royal love letters could have been the motive for an order to kill a count. Could a murder mystery be solved now with DNA evidence?

How Hitler decided to launch the largest bike theft in Denmark’s history

Hitler personally approved the decision to confiscate bikes in occupied Denmark during the war, revealing the internal power struggles among the Nazi occupiers.

Beer and a calf’s head yield gold and silver

Scientists striving to recreate the 500-year-old technique of mint masters found their solution in a boiled calf’s head and good beer.

American adventurer captured 1930's Greenland on film

The American artist and adventurer Rockwell Kent documented daily life in thirties Greenland in both photos and drawings, which are now at the centre of a large international research project.

Jutland: Why World War I's only sea battle was so crucial to Britain's victory

OPINION: Modern understanding of World War I is dominated by the immense human cost of the war on land with its trenches, artillery, and machine guns--but the war was won by sea power.

Unorthodox Gospels were Copied in the Earliest Christian Monasteries

The provenance of the Nag Hammadi Codices, famous for containing unorthodox texts like the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, and the Secret Book of John, has been a point of contention among scholars ever since they were discovered in 1945.