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Fake chiropractic treatments make for better research

Conducting research on chiropractic care is hard because it is very difficult to fool patients into thinking they have been given a treatment. But a Norwegian PhD candidate believes he has solved this problem.

Stress hormone linked to breast cancer

Women with small bloodstream levels of a stress-lowering hormone run a higher risk of breast cancer, according to a new Swedish study.

Finding a good home for dementia sufferers

Small serviced housing projects and dementia villages might provide a more normal life for dementia patients than nursing homes and institutions?

New skin cancer genes located

Scientists have discovered five new gene locations that make people vulnerable for cutaneous malignant melanomas, or skin cancer. These genes are not associated with known risk factors such as skin type or the prominence of moles a person has.

Making cycling safer for cyclists and drivers

Bicyclists, especially those who commute to work, are neither fish nor fowl: they can ride on the sidewalk, or ride in the road and take their chances with cars. How safely they ride is partly linked to how their peers see safety.

Can cheese help keep heart disease at bay?

The French diet is heavy on wine and cheese, but despite that fact heart disease is uncommon in France. A new study suggests that cheese may be the reason why.

Immigrants live longer in spite of being less well educated

The statistics are clear: Norwegians who are less well-educated die younger than individuals who have studied at university. But among immigrants to Norway, this difference is less pronounced.

Scientists: Sleep therapy beats sleeping pills

More people with severe sleep disorders should receive sleep therapy. It is at least as effective as sleeping pills, but without the side effects, concludes a new health report.

Researchers: Drop ineffective drugs for psychotic children

Take kids off antipsychotics if they do not improve after four weeks of treatment, says new research. This will shorten ineffective treatment and reduce side effects.

When science promoted sugar as healthy

Studies in the 1970s showed that people couldn’t get overweight or develop cardiovascular diseases from consumption of carbohydrates such as sugar. A Norwegian professor thinks we are still paying for this mistake.