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Diseases

Health trends over the last 45 years: We’re getting fatter — but healthier

Norway's most comprehensive population survey shows some surprising contradictions. The average Norwegian has gotten heavier over the last 45 years, while at the same time their overall physical health has improved.

Norwegian researchers find link between ALS and body weight

A Norwegian study shows that overweight and obese individuals have a lower risk for ALS than those who are of normal weight and underweight.

New medicine for multiple myeloma shows promising results

A new drug reduced the risk of relapse and increased survival by five months, according to a recent study. The results were presented at a cancer conference in Chicago in June.

Higher weight increases risk of psoriasis

The higher a person’s BMI, the greater the chance of getting psoriasis. But researchers are still uncertain as to why.

Common cell type found in autoimmune diseases

Immune cells at the centre of coeliac disease have been found in patients with other autoimmune diseases. These results give hope of finding the cause of a number of diseases.

Another tick-borne disease to worry about

Authorities don’t know how many Norwegians have been infected with the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis.

Drugs that didn’t keep their promise

The medicines were called “disease-modifying” because they were supposed to slow down the disease itself. But earlier medications for arthritis didn’t do this. Several of them, however, had dangerous side effects. Why did patients take them anyway?

Fatigue an underestimated aspect of inflammatory bowel disease

Many of those who suffer from inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also struggle with fatigue.

Many women needlessly take cholesterol-lowering drugs

More than half of middle-aged women who take cholesterol-lowering medicines called 'statins' have neither cardiovascular disease or diabetes, shows new research.

Children more likely to survive cancer if parents live together

A new study has found a correlation between family form and the survival chances of a child cancer patient.