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Depression

Cynical people are more likely to develop dementia

People with a cynical and suspicious attitude towards others develop dementia more often than other people.

Utøya survivors too often clam up

Survivors of the mass murder of young people at a summer camp by a Norwegian right-wing terrorist nearly three years ago can be reluctant to talk about their traumas, partly out of consideration for their families and friends.

Heartbreak Hotel on Blues Avenue

People with clear symptoms of depression run a 40 percent higher risk of heart failure. “The more depressed you feel, the more you are at risk,” says the Norwegian intensive care nurse who led a major study.

Doping hormone helps depressed remember better

The blood-doping hormone EPO can enhance the memory of depressed people. Combined with therapy it could ease depressed people’s way out of the mental illness, suggests scientist.

Head injury can cause mental illness

If you suffer a head trauma, your risk of developing certain mental disorders increases significantly – in some cases by more than 400 percent, new study reveals.

Sleep-deprived teens more likely to be depressed

Lots of young Norwegians fail to get their recommended dose of shuteye. Adolescents with sleep problems are five times as likely to suffer depression as peers who sleep well.

Insomnia jeopardizes physical and mental health

Extensive Norwegian data confirm that insufficient sleep increases future risks of heart attacks, chronic pain and mental problems such as depression.

The boss, not the workload, causes workplace depression

It is not a big workload that causes depression at work. An unfair boss and an unfair work environment are what really bring employees down, new study shows.

Increased risk of depression for cancer patients in alternative treatment

Breast cancer patients who use alternative methods to recover from chemotherapy or surgery are more often depressed than those who do not receive alternative treatment.

Predicting depression among older women

Scientists have discovered that low levels of a particular molecule in the brain can be used to predict depression in elderly women.