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Climate

Melting Greenland ice has not slowed down ocean circulation

GREENLAND: Two new studies suggest that meltwater from the Greenland ice sheet has not slowed down ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and may not be behind the ominous cold patch of ocean called the ‘cold blob’.

Ecosystems driven out of sync by climate change

Climate change has altered the seasonal behaviour of plants and animals throughout the food chain and could reorganise entire ecosystems in the future.

Project aims to help Indian farmers cope with extreme weather

It's crucial that the information is correct and up to date. By using information technology, the farmers know how to handle the constantly changing climate.

Greenland melt linked to weird weather in Europe and USA

GREENLAND: The Arctic is warming more than anywhere else and Greenland might be melting faster than previously thought. See how this could affect you in our interactive map.

Buttock hair used to monitor Arctic musk ox

GREENLAND: Musk ox are a key species in the Arctic, but populations are in decline. A new method is helping scientists to monitor these animals in often difficult to reach, remote locations.

Early Earth may have been freezing cold

Contrary to popular belief: When Earth’s first organisms were formed, it may have been in an ice cold ocean.

Eco-cement from Norwegian clay

Blue clay from Norway is emerging as a climate-friendly alternative to cements used to make concrete – turning a waste material into a resource.

This is how your personal consumption affects the climate

You won’t make big cuts in your environmental impact by taking shorter showers or turning out the lights. The real environmental problem, a new analysis has shown, is embodied in the things you buy.

Mapping the world for climate sensitivity

By using information gathered by satellites, a group of biologists have developed a new method for measuring ecosystem sensitivity to climate variability.

Glaciers on Svalbard behave differently

Many glaciers on Svalbard behave very differently. They advance massively for some years and then quickly retreat – and then remain quiescent for fifty to a hundred years – before they once again start to advance.