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Children and adolescents

Violent computer games cleared by researchers

New Swedish study breaks with previous research on the link between computer games and violence. It turns out that success in the games requires cooperation and patience.

Stress is good for children

Can children who are never exposed to stress grow up to be strong individuals? A psychologist doesn’t think so.

Understanding today’s rude teens

When some teenagers are being ill-mannered, violent or degrading, it’s not due to a clash with authorities. It’s because other people are without relevance in their world.

Mediation doesn't solve domestic violence problems

When parents decide to split up, mediation sometimes conceals problems rather than solving them.

Terror victims will get research protection

Norwegian authorities want to minimise future trauma for victims of the massacre on 22 July last year by coordinating all research on the terrorist attacks through a national body.

Hormone-impairing substances make daughters fat

Pregnant women with high levels of hormone-impairing substances in their blood have a three times higher risk than other women of giving birth to daughters who will be overweight at the age of 20.

School screening tests misused

Screening tests designed to spot pupils who need extra assistance in reading, are used to rank schools. Also pupils are trained specifically for the tests to maximise their scores, claims Norwegian reading expert.

Baby cries shorten our reaction time

The sound of a baby crying motivates our brain’s alertness and sharpens our ability to react with highly accurate movements. The sound of a woman crying does not have the same effect.

Self-harm is not only for troubled teens

Self-inflicted cuts and burns have become such a widespread phenomenon that ordinary, otherwise well-balanced young people have started doing it. The problem is seen in both sexes to an equal degree.

Everyday chemicals impair effects of vaccines

High concentrations of so-called PFCs in children’s blood reduce the effect of vaccines, a new Faroese/Danish study shows.