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Biology

Why insects always hide in the dark

It is no coincidence that insect larvae always hide away in dark corners. Scientists have now discovered how the larvae know where it’s best to hide away.

Bison may boost Danish vegetation

A new study sets out to clarify what effect the reintroduction of bison will have on the Danish countryside. The bison may open up for a more diverse flora, says researcher.

Mechanism behind weird membrane patterns revealed

See pictures of the mysterious cell membrane patterns that scientists discovered five years ago. The mechanism behind these patterns has now been uncovered.

Microscopic arms race rages on the seabed

The ocean floor contains viruses and bacteria locked in a constant struggle for survival. This has a great effect on the carbon cycle in the ocean and thus also affects how much CO2 is released into the atmosphere.

Key mechanism in essential enzyme uncovered

Scientists know that when certain steroids bind to the essential enzyme known as the sodium pump, it can both kill and cure. Now they have also solved the mystery of how this molecular binding occurs.

Childhood obesity gene identified

Defects on a special ’satiety gene’ may constitute a rare but important cause of early childhood obesity.

Cancer enzymes are smarter than we thought

Scientists have discovered a previously unknown ability in some enzymes, which can cause cancer to spread if they are unbalanced. The discovery of this function may be crucial to more effective treatment, says researcher.

Fight fish disease with fish

Scientists are checking the possibility of limiting the spread of the dangerous fish disease FZT with the help of a very special fish.

Pregnant women with pets have more vaginal E. coli

Intestinal bacteria from dogs and cats appear to colonise pregnant women’s vagina, which can increase the risk of e.g. urinary tract infections. This may be caused by the bacteria travelling from the animal via the woman’s hands to her vagina.

Hunger increases support for social welfare

If we are hungry when we’re asked about our attitude towards welfare, we are more likely to show support for a social welfare policy. This is a biological impulse which ensures survival, new research suggests.