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Biology

Humans alone killed off the giant moa bird

New research reveals that the moa population were fit and healthy before humans started hunting the bird. In spite of this, it took less than 200 years before the gigantic bird had died out.

Map outlines global hotpots of bycatch intensity

Fishery bycatch poses a great threat to various endangered species, and to ecosystems in general. Scientists have now mapped out the problem.

Metabolism works differently than we thought

Kleiber’s law of metabolism, which states that the metabolic rate of an animal scales to the 3/4 power of the mass, has a flaw in it, argues Danish scientist.

Animal origin theory challenged: Early animals needed almost no oxygen

The first animals on Earth could get by with much less oxygen than previously thought, new study reveals.

Why do headless chickens run?

The brain does not control all body movements. Some movements are to a great extent controlled by neural networks in the spinal cord. This is why a chicken can run away after you chop its head off. A new study takes a closer look at this strange phenomenon.

Even tiny oil spills may break Arctic food chain

Drilling for oil in the Arctic may have catastrophic consequences, new study suggests.

Primitive worms threaten harvests

They live in the soil, are numerous, and can be microscopic. Yet nematodes can effectively kill off fruit trees and cereals.

Can we avoid animal testing entirely?

Scientists are working flat out to find alternatives to animal testing. QSAR computer models are looking promising.

Secret mission of microscopic drones revealed

Vaccinations of cattle and sheep against insect-borne diseases cost society millions each year. Danish researcher sheds new light on how the little bloodsucking creatures spread disease.

Head injury can cause mental illness

If you suffer a head trauma, your risk of developing certain mental disorders increases significantly – in some cases by more than 400 percent, new study reveals.