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Sweden

Snus doesn’t prevent cavities

People who use oral snuff tobacco, best known by its Scandinavian name snus, get roughly as many cavities as everyone else. And if you are concerned about dental health, stay clear of the new non-tobacco, nicotine-free variety.

Mum’s pollen exposure links to baby’s asthma

Heavy pollen exposure in late pregnancy raises the risk of asthma early in life for the baby. If a mother smokes, however, pollen in the air during a baby’s first three months is less likely to trigger asthma.

Antidepressants don’t increase stillbirths

Pregnant women who take medications against depression are not raising the risk of a stillbirth or the death of their infant.

Fixing the heart via the brain

Thyroid gland complications can lead to heart trouble. Swedish researchers think help can be found in the brain.

Copying parental suicides

Teenagers are at particular risk of committing suicide if one of their parents attempts it ‒ especially within the first couple of years.

Foreseeing a future of fewer strokes and heart attacks

Increased health care costs in the gray-haired future might be smaller than feared as the incidents of stroke and heart attack are likely to fall in the decades ahead.

Women politicians get more bad press than men

Male politicians involved in scandals are treated more mildly in Swedish newspapers than their female counterparts, according to a recent study.

In Sweden, helping and caring are on the rise

With one of the oldest populations in the world, Sweden needs its citizens to reach out and help each other in informal, neighbourly ways. New research shows a dramatic rise in the number of Swedes who are doing exactly that.

Trains should be more like cars

A Swedish researcher rails against hazardous luggage systems.

Massages reduce stress and anxiety

Have high blood pressure? Stressed after surgery? New research suggests your doctor could prescribe gentle massage to augment more traditional hospital treatments.