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Sweden

Plumbers and hairdressers share asthma threat

Plumbers, hairdressers and painters risk developing asthma from the chemicals they encounter, despite regulations for protective gear and other safeguards.

Spending a king’s ransom on outdoor recreation

The old anoraks and worn-out boots are gone. We spend a lot of money on outdoor activities that used to be free because we think special equipment is needed ‒ or makes us look cool.

Gender equality for crash test dummies, too

Crash test dummies are always male. That means today's cars don't protect women as well as men. Swedish researchers think the solution is a female crash test dummy -- and they have made one.

Cutting diabetics’ amputations by half

Relatively simple interventions to treat diabetic foot sores can reduce amputations significantly, according to Swedish orthopaedists.

Treating stomach pains with hypnosis

Hypnosis can provide lasting relief against irritable bowel syndrome, shows Swedish research.

Time to reboot our image of gamers

Who plays computer games? The typical gamer plays to socialise and prefers to play with friends and family, rather than strangers.

Snus doesn’t prevent cavities

People who use oral snuff tobacco, best known by its Scandinavian name snus, get roughly as many cavities as everyone else. And if you are concerned about dental health, stay clear of the new non-tobacco, nicotine-free variety.

Mum’s pollen exposure links to baby’s asthma

Heavy pollen exposure in late pregnancy raises the risk of asthma early in life for the baby. If a mother smokes, however, pollen in the air during a baby’s first three months is less likely to trigger asthma.

Antidepressants don’t increase stillbirths

Pregnant women who take medications against depression are not raising the risk of a stillbirth or the death of their infant.

Fixing the heart via the brain

Thyroid gland complications can lead to heart trouble. Swedish researchers think help can be found in the brain.