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Sweden

How Norwegian war refugees changed Swedish politics

When Norwegian refugees first sought sanctuary in neighbouring Sweden, they were sent back. But in the last years of the war, Sweden opened its arms to refugees. What happened?

Healthiest to limit sugar, but not cut it completely

It’s OK to eat a little sugar, but stay away from sugary soft drinks. Still, Swedish researchers are not sure how sugar affects our general health.

Grandsons' health at risk if grandpa ate well in his youth

This odd connection may be due to our genes being affected by the world around us.

Eat your spinach, it’s good for your heart

If you want to take care of your heart, you may want to eat more spinach or other greens. But eat it raw.

It’s easier to learn new languages if you have a thick cortex

Swedish researchers have discovered a connection between the ability to learn a new language and the brain's structure. The thicker the cerebral cortex, the better the participants understood the grammar of a language they had never encountered before.

The Arctic: we don’t know as much about environmental change in the far north as we'd like to think

The region is warming faster than anywhere else on Earth and its polar bears and melting glaciers have become a key symbols of climate change. But the Arctic, it seems, is not as well researched as you might think.

Slow motion bats are the secret to next generation drones

Swedish researchers are studying how bats manoeuvre to create next-generation drones.

The hidden price of Iceland’s green energy

In times of runaway climate change, phasing out fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewables is imperative. But this transition is not without pitfalls as shown by a recent study of two large renewable projects in Iceland.

Why do people talk politics online?

OPINION: Because they don’t care what you think

Just one sleepless night can tell your body to start storing fat

Sleep is one of those physiological necessities that continues to puzzle researchers. But a new study illuminates how missing one single night of sleep can initiate a series of physiological changes, and not necessarily for the better.